Snapdragon 810 overheating complaints return with retail debut of Sony Xperia Z4

Oh Snapdragon 810, will you ever catch a break? While on paper the SoC looks like an obvious choice for bringing flagship-level performance to a new smartphone, the chip’s arrival on the market has been maligned by recurrent reports of excessive operating temperatures. It seems like every few months new voices arrive to warn of the 810’s thermal woes, only for others to step up and insist this really isn’t a problem, and that any previous overheating issues have been addressed in the chips landing in currently available phones. Well, today Japan gets its hands on the Xperia Z4 (while the rest of us await the start of sales for the essentially-the-same-thing Xperia Z3+), and the 810 overheating panic seems to be back in full force.

New Z4 owners are already taking to social media to complain about their hotter-than-they’d-like handsets. They’ve been posting screenshots of diagnostic software revealing on-device temperature readings in the 135-155F range.

It seems that even retailers are worried about how hot the phone is getting: a sign in a DoCoMo store (below) warns users to periodically power-down their devices and conduct regular backups in an effort to keep temperatures in check and avoid data loss in the event of an overheating-related crash.

Whether or not running hot impacts the Z4’s commercial success – and long-term user satisfaction – remains to be seen, but from this launch it sure feels like the Snapdragon 810’s struggles aren’t over just yet.

z4-warning

Source: RBMen (Google Translate), Livedoor (Google Translate)
Via: Xperia Blog

knowyouido

Share This Post

Watch the Latest Pocketnow Videos

About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits Read more about Stephen Schenck!