Parallels is a well-known name when it comes to providing cross-platform solutions for running applications across different operating systems. Now, the company has joined hands with Google for bringing Windows apps to Chrome OS. The company is targeting the arrival of full-featured Windows applications on Chrome OS for enterprise customers in the fall season.

In the company’s own words, the partnership will allow enterprises to “seamlessly add full-featured Windows apps, including Microsoft Office, to Chromebook Enterprise devices.” One of the biggest advantages of the project is that it will help enterprise users reduce the cost of hardware required to run apps and software limited to one specific platform by introducing cross-platform functionality.

The company has not gone into detail as to how it will achieve that, but more details about the partnership and other technical aspects will be revealed in the upcoming months. John Solomon, VP of Chome OS, mentioned in a blog post that the collaboration will allow the company to bring legacy applications such as Microsoft Office desktop apps to Chrome OS.

Source: Parallels

I’ve been writing about consumer technology for over three years now, having worked with names such as NDTV and Beebom in the past. Aside from covering the latest news, I’ve reviewed my fair share of devices ranging from smartphones and laptops to smart home devices. I also have interviewed tech execs and appeared as a host in YouTube videos talking about the latest and greatest gadgets out there.
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