Tag Heuer Connected Modular 41 is a smaller, slightly cheaper luxury Android Wear watch

Luxury traditional watchmaker Tag Heuer couldn’t come out with an upgraded version of the Android Wear-powered Connected Modular 45 just one year after releasing that exorbitantly priced beauty, so instead, this week’s Geneva Days 2018 event is bringing us a smaller, slightly more affordable model.

Aptly named the Tag Heuer Connected Modular 41, this “brand-new” smartwatch simply adapts the 45 mm original’s super-premium design and style for the “smallest wrists.” Under the 41 mm hood, the wearable device features an unspecified Intel processor that may well be the same Atom Z34XX found inside the Modular 45.

But the Modular 41 also packs 1GB RAM and 8GB storage space, up from 512MB and 4GB respectively on its forerunner and bigger brother. Thanks to a smaller size, the new AMOLED screen offers improved 326 ppi density as well, despite a 390 x 390 resolution that’s technically inferior to the 400 x 400 pixels delivered by the 1.39-inch first-gen version for a 287 ppi count.

Everything else appears to be the same, both inside and out, including a laundry list of sensors and connectivity options. Yes, the Tag Heuer Connected Modular 41 supports Android Pay (aka Google Pay) with built-in NFC, accurately tracking your location during extended running sessions with GPS, and even resisting water immersion up to 50 meters.

“Entirely” Swiss Made, the “innovative, unique and distinctive” watch collection lets you choose from 7 “standard” models, 9 different straps, including new pink, blue and white leather flavors, also supporting seamless replacement of the “connected module” with a three-hand mechanical body for a more retro, elegant look.

Available to purchase online in a “selection of markets”, this thing obviously doesn’t come cheap, starting at $1,200 in the US, and €1,100 on the old continent.

Share This Post

Watch the Latest Pocketnow Videos

About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).