T-Mobile’s new LG Stylo 3 Plus only costs $225 with massive Full HD screen, ‘premium’ stylus

It’s certainly not unusual to see smartphone vendors release a new, slightly revised high-ender every six or seven months nowadays. But LG might be taking things a little too far in the mid-range segment with the launch of the affordable yet more than respectable Stylo 3 Plus today, just a few months after the international Stylus 3 announcement and subsequent Stylo 3 prepaid rollout at Boost and Virgin Mobile.

Of course, this is more T-Mobile’s doing than LG’s, mimicking a move from last year, when the Stylo 2 Plus didn’t wait very long to follow the “regular”, lower-end Stylo 2.

Compared to the original Stylo 3, the LG Stylo 3 Plus available already with the “Un-carrier” for $225 is sharper and capable of accommodating more digital content internally. You get 32 instead of 16GB base storage space, a Full HD, not merely HD, 5.7-inch IPS LCD screen, and basically identical specs otherwise.

A bundled “premium” stylus pen pompously comes “fully loaded with style and class”, and then you have a bunch of decent but short of impressive features like 13 and 5MP cameras, fingerprint recognition, an octa-core Snapdragon 435 processor, Android 7.0 Nougat software, 4G LTE and Bluetooth 4.2 connectivity.

By the way, you can obviously pay the $225 in full when picking up the LG Stylo 3 Plus from T-Mobile’s online store and “participating” retail locations nationwide, or split the MSRP in 24 monthly installments of $9 with another $9 coughed up first. Either way, you’re making a solid deal.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).