Odds against Samsung introducing LPDDR5 RAM for Galaxy S10

A couple of rumors that got brought up in the spec dump for the Galaxy S10 were the potential for up to 12GB of RAM on the 5G version of the S10+ and for two cameras to appear on the regular Galaxy S10 model as opposed to three.

All that volatile memory will warrant faster speeds than even what Samsung’s own LPDDR4X design can provide now for up to 4.3Gbps transfer rates. Back in July, Samsung ventured again to produce the first LPDDR5 RAM disk with more data banks, less power usage and up to 6.4Gbps.

But it was initially believed that LPDDR5 wouldn’t be widely implemented until 2020 — this as even the DDR5 standard has been delayed. So with the display unit being a token single gigabyte, there would have to be more work put in to scale products up.

Hearing from Max of All About Samsung — who provided some key intel in the aforementioned spec dump — we’re made to believe that the Galaxy S10 “might” use LPDDR5 RAM.

The word “might” is quite the hedge here. Either LPDDR5 will or won’t be on the Galaxy S10, plain and simple. The suggestion that Samsung has somehow fast-tracked development was tempting to believe, though.

However, Chinese leaks blogger Ice Universe seems to have some counterintelligence on the RAM claim as well as some contention as to how many cameras will appear on the rear of all Galaxy S10 models.

The chassis housing evidence to the three-camera claim for the S10 is circumstantial at this point, but if it is to be believed that in-display fingerprint sensors will be used, then we could have a fairly strong case here. As to the AnTuTu benchmark scores for the RAM, we’re keen to see more samples before totally taking the LPDDR5 off the table — there’s always the chance the disk is being throttled — but it’s already on the ledge of credulity at the moment.

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Jules Wang
Jules Wang is News Editor for Pocketnow and one of the hosts of the Pocketnow Weekly Podcast. He came onto the team in 2014 as an intern editing and producing videos and the podcast while he was studying journalism at Emerson College. He graduated the year after and entered into his current position at Pocketnow, full-time.