In the grand scheme of the tech industry, conventional Android-running tablets have stopped being relevant a while ago. But Samsung isn’t ready to throw in the towel just yet, as it continues to diversify its jumbo-sized gadget portfolio instead of streamlining or rescinding it altogether.

Unfortunately, the Galaxy View merely made headlines with its weirdness of late, while the Tab E, Tab A (2016) and rehashed Tab S2 went largely unnoticed as they tackled different little portions of the world Samsung easily controls when it comes to smartphones.

Now the 8-inch Galaxy Tab E spreads its wings stateside, though most AT&T customers are bound to forget all about it in no time. Unless Ma Bell artificially keeps it in the limelight with constant discounts and bundle deals of sorts, which seems like a challenge given the slate will start off pretty darn affordable.

At $200, to be specific, or $0 down and $10 every 30 days for 20 months with installment plans. The quality – pricing ratio isn’t half bad either, the overall respectable spec sheet including stuff like 1,280 x 800 screen resolution, pre-loaded Android 6.0 Marshmallow, quad-core Snapdragon 410 power, 1.5GB RAM, 16GB expandable storage, 4G LTE connectivity, and a generous 5,000 mAh battery.

Pre-orders kick off on Friday, May 6, followed by a prospective international release of a Galaxy Tab 4 Advanced variant before long. The name isn’t settled, and therefore you shouldn’t rule out Tab 5 branding, even though the benchmarked SM-T536 prototype doesn’t look like a massive upgrade over the 2014 SM-T530, aka Tab 4 10.1.

The display is still only capable of delivering HD content, you get 2GB RAM in lieu of 1.5, a 32GB ROM, 5 and 2MP cameras, Marshmallow software goodies, as well as a mystery octa-core Cortex A53 CPU paired with a Mali-T830 GPU that could be the Exynos 7870 silicon also found inside the Galaxy J7 (2016) handheld. Bottom line, yet another forgettable mid-ranger on a budget.

Sources: AT&T Newsroom, GFX Bench

You May Also Like
Huawei Mate 30 Pro review

Huawei Mate 30 Pro review: the best phone you can’t get, and that’s OK

In our Huawei Mate 30 Pro review we’re trying to answer the question of whether the phone can survive without Google support, and should you buy it?

Companies could soon get licenses to sell to Huawei

Good news for Huawei: In a recent Bloomberg interview, Commerce Secretary W. Ross said he was optimistic about reaching a “Phase One” China deal this month.

The upcoming Moto Razr has been spotted in the wild, with a huge chin

It seems that the new Moto Razr is already being caught in the wild, with a huge chin, and there’s a picture to prove it