OnePlus 6T McLaren edition makes a “fearless” jump to 10GB of RAM

There are a handful of vanity products in the mobile industry that don’t necessarily give a functional boost to their users, but boy, aren’t they pretty to look at? From Vertu‘s failed courting of the rich to Huawei’s passionate linkup with Porsche Design, consumers have found no substantial spec bump for the extra sterling they would sink into buying a fancy phone.

OnePlus, however, has decided to break the norms. It has inked a partnership with McLaren to launch the OnePlus 6T McLaren edition and is introducing not only new looks, but new hardware features.

As these brands are obsessed with speed, its fitting that this device revolves around two major numbers: 10 and 30. The 10GB of RAM to keep more apps in quick-storage memory and shoot 4K footage at 60 frames per second. And then there’s Warp Charge 30 — the ’30’ standing for 30 watts of power — with a touted full day’s power in just 20 minutes on the outlet. OnePlus has redesigned the OnePlus 6T‘s battery, its power adapter and has modified its power management to keep heat down and performance up.

The device and charging block are accented in McLaren’s signature Papaya Orange with special care taken to the McLaren Speedmark logo and the carbon fiber-like — to be clear, not actual carbon fiber, just glass — stripe patterning on the OnePlus 6T. In addition, there’s a design book and a carbon fiber Speedmark emblem.

Even as OnePlus’s most expensive phone on record, we’re told that pricing starts at $699 with availability in Europe, India and North America beginning December 13. China should receive the OnePlus 6T McLaren edition at a later date.

We’re missing out on all of the major specs and configurations at this point, but stay tuned to Pocketnow as we put our hands on this device.

Share This Post

Watch the Latest Pocketnow Videos

About The Author
Jules Wang
Jules Wang is News Editor for Pocketnow and one of the hosts of the Pocketnow Weekly Podcast. He came onto the team in 2014 as an intern editing and producing videos and the podcast while he was studying journalism at Emerson College. He graduated the year after and entered into his current position at Pocketnow, full-time.