5G

Huawei has been under heavy scrutiny worldwide when it comes to network infrastructure and its presence on the market. The U.S. kicked things off, then  Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom all followed suit. Even the EU expressed concerns over a possible implication of Beijing in Huawei’s operations. Despite all that, the Chinese manufacturer managed to secure 25 5G clients, and its revenue figures continue to grow.

Norway’s Justice Minister Tor Mikkel Wara said that his country is considering joining the list of nations that ban Huawei from participating in building the country’s 5G infrastructure. “We share the same concerns as the United States and Britain and that is espionage on private and state actors in Norway”, he said.

Despite of the fact that Huawei has repeatedly denied all allegations and offered reassurances that their equipment is secure, more and more countries are banning the Chinese company from bids or other activities. “Our customers in Norway have strong security requirements of us and they manage the risk in their operations in a good way. We will continue to be open and transparent and offer extended testing and verification of our equipment to prove that we can deliver secure products in the 5G network in Norway,” said Tore Orderloekken, Cyber Security Officer at Huawei Norway.

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