Cell-enabled Nexus 7 tablets finally get access to Android Lollipop

After Android 5.0 Lollipop debuted with the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9 last fall, Google was quick to start making Lollipop updates available for most of the rest of the Nexus family. We saw phones and tablets alike graduate from KitKat to Android 5.0, then 5.0.1, and most recently, a few select models have been graced with Android 5.0.2. And while that was great, not every Nexus device was so quick to join the Lollipop party: despite Google making numerous Lollipop updates available for its WiFi-only tablets, neither the 2012 nor 2013 cell-enabled Nexus 7 had seen similar updates for themselves. Today, Google finally starts bringing these two models into the fold, releasing Android 5.0.2 factory images for the pair.

That’s right: the two cellular-capable Nexus 7 tablets are skipping right past 5.0 and 5.0.1 to catch up with their WiFi-only brothers at 5.0.2. Downloads to each are available through the source link below, ready to be flashed as soon as you unlock your bootloader.

For now, that’s all we have; presumably, users will start seeing availability of over-the-air updates in the days to come, but we haven’t heard any reports of those just yet. And as soon as those start going out, it’s only a matter of time before someone grabs the update links and the OTA ZIPs becomes available for convenient manual installation.

We know, you cell-enabled Nexus 7 owners have been waiting long enough already, but it shouldn’t be much longer now. And there’s always the factory image option if you can’t wait, but this is still big progress all the same: you’re soon to join the full-fledged Lollipop club with the rest of your family members.

Source: Google
Via: Droid Life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits Read more about Stephen Schenck!