Customary durability tests prove ‘new’ Nokia 3310 is quite strong though far from indestructible

Can you believe it’s taken professional gadget torturer Zack Nelson from DIY YouTube channel JerryRigEverything this long to put the “modern” Nokia 3310 (2017) to the usual batch of unscientific but practical and fun durability tests?

The original version’s extraordinary reliability and resistance to drops, while exaggerated close to urban legend levels, is at least partly real and indisputable, which put quite a bit of pressure on the ultra-affordable sequel.

Granted, HMD Global never made any ambitious claims regarding the new “dumb” phone’s robustness, instead focusing largely on an updated, more playful design, top-notch battery life and… Snake.

Still, those of you able to purchase the refreshed 3310 as a backup or starter device may want to know just how cheap the build quality is. Unsurprisingly, this is a far from premium all-plastic affair prone to scratches and scuffs, and it’s not exactly your go-to post-apocalyptic electronic companion, falling victim to the routine volcanic eruption before you can wonder what you were doing around a volcano in the first place.

But here’s the positive side in arguably the most important part of these kinds of experiments. The 2017 take on the iconic Nokia 3310 doesn’t bend, crack or break. Definitely not as effortlessly as the “smart” Honor 6X and HTC U11 costing hundreds of dollars more.

That means you can probably carry the thing in your back trouser pocket without worrying a quick accidental sitdown will completely wreck it. At $50 or so, that’s a major asset.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).