T-Mobile’s official, proper, stable launch of the “revolutionary” DIGITS functionality is probably not as big of a deal as the latest Verizon-ditching offer, which takes the “qualifying” trade-in out of the equation and lets you keep and even protect your relatively new iPhone or Google Pixel device on Magenta.

But this is also very much about helping the “Un-carrier” stand out from the pack, seemingly aping AT&T’s NumberSync feature while taking convenience to the next level, as T-Mo likes to do. With beta tests successfully concluded six months in, DIGITS can roll out for free to all of the “industry-shaking” operator’s customers and even folks on other networks starting May 31.

Say good-bye to conventional phone numbers, each tied to a different device, and hello to a single line of access for your handheld (s), smartwatch, tablet and computer. At the same time, if you want to merge your personal and work contact on just one phone, you can also do that without having to own separate SIM cards or a dual SIM-enabled product.

Only the first DIGITS line is technically provided free of charge, but for a limited time, T-Mobile ONE Plus subscribers also get a backup sans extra costs. There’s an Android or iOS app you’ll need to download to make everything work as it’s supposed to, or if you have a Samsung Galaxy S8, S7, Note 5 or S6-series device, expect to see DIGITS activated by default. The “digital age” of phone numbers starts… on Wednesday.

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