Android Wear 2.0-powered Misfit Vapor is launching next week after painfully long wait

There’s no shortage of super-expensive “luxury” Android Wear 2.0 smartwatches from traditional fashion brands right now, but when it comes to low-cost, understated devices manufactured by consumer electronics specialists, the modern options are surprisingly limited.

One of the more promising, elegant and affordable new wave Google-powered wearable products was actually not meant to run Android Wear 2.0 initially. Unfortunately, it was also supposed to start selling months ago, hitting delay after delay until finally opening pre-orders yesterday.

Only a small fraction of prospective Misfit Vapor buyers can secure their place at the front of the line, namely US-based folks who previously signed up for a special email newsletter. Regional shipments will begin on October 31, followed by select other markets “soon” enough.

Still priced at $199, the circular, relatively stylish but bulky-looking watch comes with built-in Google Assistant support, “connected” GPS functionality, and its very own heart rate monitor.

Water resistant up to 50 meters, the Misfit Vapor needs to sync to an iPhone or Android handset to accurately track your location, also lacking a speaker, NFC technology for wrist payments, and of course, cellular capabilities.

All in all, you get pretty standard features for your two Benjamins, including Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity, a 1.39-inch AMOLED display with 326 ppi density, Snapdragon 2100 processing power, 4GB internal storage, a built-in microphone, accelerometer, altimeter, gyroscope, and 360mAh battery capacity “optimized” for an “estimated” 24 hours of usage.

But it might be too little, too late, or at least too late, especially with the LG Watch Style available for $180 at the time of writing after a $70 markdown.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).