Huawei Mate 10 Pro durability gets JerryRigEverything’s beating, fares well

If you’re not familiar with Zack Nelson’s work on YouTube, his bread and butter projects these days on the JerryRigEverything channel has to do with the complete inspection and annihilation of smartphones. He does it so the rest of us don’t (purposefully) have to. But it’s also to give us an idea of what to expect when it comes to dinging and bashing our multi-hundred-dollar investment day in and day out.

The most recent victim was the Huawei Mate 10 Pro. The Chinese manufacturer has made its highest profile attempt at some brand recognition in the United States and it certainly had a beautiful device to show for it. But will it survive burns, scratches and a gruesome bend test?

We encourage you to take a look at the video below. You can also scroll down for some quick notes on the testing.

  • Most tempered glass scratches at level 6 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness and that’s exactly where marks will start to appear on the Mate 10 Pro’s display glass.
  • The chassis and buttons are made out of anodized aluminium. Occasional plastic banding allows the internal antennas to get better reception.
  • The rear-side dual-camera system should be able to take on most scratches fine.
  • The capacitive fingerprint sensor, even after heavy damage inflicted by blade, is still able to register and authenticate users accurately.
  • Taking a lighter to the AMOLED display, Nelson finds that it takes 40 seconds to cause permanent, if minor damage to the diodes — most OLED units take between 10 and 20 seconds.
  • When bent, the phone does not separate into disparate layers nor does any part of it creak. Flex is minimal at what we’re completely guessing to be a grip strength of about 40kg.

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About The Author
Jules Wang
Jules Wang is News Editor for Pocketnow and one of the hosts of the Pocketnow Weekly Podcast. He came onto the team in 2014 as an intern editing and producing videos and the podcast while he was studying journalism at Emerson College. He graduated the year after and entered into his current position at Pocketnow, full-time.