Huawei Band 2 Pro stands out with GPS and running coach functions, Band 2 will likely be extra-cheap

Huawei may not put a lot of advertising emphasis on its diverse family of wearable devices these days, but it’s one of a few companies able to provide decent alternatives for both the high-end Apple Watch and lower-profile Fitbits.

You’ve got your “premium” Huawei Watch 2 and Watch 2 Classic, a Huawei Fit starting at around $110 right now and squeezing somewhere between stylish smartwatches and basic activity trackers in terms of both design and features, as well as a newly unveiled Huawei Band 2/Band 2 Pro duo.

No words on recommended pricing just yet, though we can probably safely assume at least the regular Band 2 will slot below the Fit on the wearable totem pole. The Huawei Band 2 Pro, meanwhile, appears to have everything it takes to give the likes of the Fitbit Charge 2 a run for their money.

All-day heart rate monitoring, TruSleep tracking, a professional running algorithm with VO2Max detection and personal sports coach “qualification”, 5 ATM water resistance, you name it. There’s even built-in GPS, which the Charge 2 doesn’t have.

Both the Huawei Band 2 and Band 2 Pro don a so-called “PMOLED” display, which is just another fancy name for a small, sharp and frugal panel. So frugal that a tiny 100 mAh battery taking only 1.5 hours to fast charge to 100 percent capacity can last up to 21 days before needing resuscitation.

Available with black, blue or red straps, the wrist-worn devices are billed as ideal companions for Huawei phones while obviously fully supporting any Android handset, as well as iPhones.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).