In a bid to enhance the security aspect of Google Meet, Google has announced that its video-conferencing platform will now automatically block anonymous users from joining an education meeting. To make it clear early on, this feature will be enabled by default for end users as well as admins, and might take up to 15 days to reach all users.

Thanks to the new rule change, anonymous users will now be barred from joining a meeting organized by someone with a G Suite for Education or G Suite Enterprise for Education license. This feature will likely keep distracting miscreants at bay who crash an online meeting after receiving a publicly shared link.

“Anonymous users can cause disruption to learning by making noise and sharing content, and become a distraction for the meeting organizer when they try to join meetings,” says Google. However, admins will still have the option to request an exception for this rule by talking to a G Suite support executive.

Source: Google Blog (G Suite Updates)

I’ve been writing about consumer technology for over three years now, having worked with names such as NDTV and Beebom in the past. Aside from covering the latest news, I’ve reviewed my fair share of devices ranging from smartphones and laptops to smart home devices. I also have interviewed tech execs and appeared as a host in YouTube videos talking about the latest and greatest gadgets out there.
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