Purported Galaxy Note 5 case designs reveal S6-like changes (including no rear speaker)

With June drawing to a close, we’re likely just over two months away from the arrival of the Samsung Galaxy Note 5. Even with so little time between now and IFA, there’s still a ton of uncertainty surrounding this phablet, not the least of which concerning the fate of a curved-display Edge variant. Today, however, our focus is still on the regular flat-screened Note 5, as some early case renders attempt to clue us in to some of the phablet’s design choices.

That rough-looking render up top may not be very pretty, but if what it depicts is accurate, we’re looking forward to a Note 5 that takes heavy inspiration from the Galaxy S6.

That sort of direction for the Note 5 isn’t a particularly controversial idea, but we’re still very much interested in getting confirmation for some of those specifics. Those include the repositioning of the phone’s speaker from its back panel to along its lower edge (finally!), as well as moving the handset’s headphone jack down to the same area.

And despite those rumors about Samsung going with a reversible USB type-C connector for the Note 5, the cutout in this design sure looks like a typical micro USB.

The handset’s layout also takes a page from the GS6’s camera, with the same raised squircle once again present here. We’re not convinced yet just how accurate any of this info is, but with plenty of additional leaks sure to arrive over the next couple months, we’ll have lots of other evidence to compere this against.

note-5-redcase

Source: Nowhereelse.fr (Google Translate)
Via: phoneArena

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Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits Read more about Stephen Schenck!