Cricket Wireless picks up $150 ZTE Blade X Max with Android 7.1.1 and 6-inch 1080p screen

Let’s face it, the odds of ever seeing ZTE’s Nubia sub-brand release its upcoming Snapdragon 835 flagship stateside are slim, to say the least. Meanwhile, the Chinese OEM’s plans for the Axon family remain largely under wraps.

Ergo, instead of any new high-ender, the company’s US-based fans have to settle for one of several mid-range devices available on Boost Mobile, US Cellular or Cricket Wireless. Well, they’re not so much different products as the same ground design with minimal revisions inside the hood and out.

The latest to officially see daylight is cheaper than USC’s dual rear cam-sporting Blade MAX 3, but slightly pricier than the Android 7.1.1-running ZTE MAX XL over at Boost Mobile. As rumored a few weeks ago, the 6-inch 1080p ZTE Blade X Max is exclusive to prepaid AT&T daughter operator Cricket, setting you back $149.99 starting tomorrow, May 12, both on and offline.

For that MSRP, you seem to get plenty of bang, including the freshest flavor of Nougat software, octa-core Snapdragon 435 processing power, 2GB RAM and 32GB internal storage space. There’s also a microSD card slot allowing you to expand the digital hoarding room by up to 128GB, 3400mAh battery capacity, QuickCharge 2.0 support, USB Type-C connectivity, and yes, even a headphone jack, Dolby Audio technology and built-in FM radio.

A single 13MP rear-facing camera is doubled by a 5MP front shooter with Screen Flash functionality, and you also get a secure and convenient fingerprint reader located on the back of the ZTE Blade X Max. Not too shabby.

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu
Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).