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Legislation could ban Apple from shipping iPhone with its own apps

By Roland Udvarlaki June 17, 2021, 2:24 pm
iPhone 12

A new legislation could prevent Apple from pre-installing its own apps on iPhones. Apple is in the news a lot lately, mainly because of its fight with Epic Games and Facebook, fighting over anti-competitive practices. There might be some changes coming to iPhone and iOS, in the near future.

The new antitrust legislation was proposed last week, it could introduce significant changes to future iPhones. David Cicilline, a representative, has confirmed the news with reporters, some of which was posted by Bloomberg.

As it stands today, Apple preloads its own applications such as Messages, Calendar, Notes, Photos, FaceTime and more. This could change in the near future as Apple could be made to offer alternatives for consumers to download. In theory, this could look similar to how Google was forced in the EU to offer a different, alternative search engine while setting up a new device.

Cicilline said the following:

“It would be equally easy to download the other five apps as the Apple one so they’re not using their market dominance to favor their own products and services,”

If the legislation passes, it would introduce a drastically new setup process on an iPhone. This is certainly bad news for Apple, who is now a big player in the services field, it could potentially reduce its revenues and overall, hurt its business. It’s not all bad news for consumers however, it could certainly provide more choice and freedom as to what is available to download and use, right when setting up a new device.

Additionally, Cicilline also mentioned that this would also apply to Amazon Prime as Amazon can sell its own products, which can have a negative impact and hurt third-party products and sellers.

There doesn’t seem to be any talk about including any other products at this time, such as tablets or computers right now, but personally, I could see them being added sooner or later, although it’s an entirely different story when it gets to computers and operating systems. The House Judiciary Committee will review the five bills at a hearing next week, so we’ll likely hear a lot more about the proposed ban in the near future.

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