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Components

Apple’s new A16 Bionic chip could be made using a 4nm process

By Samuel Martinez November 3, 2021, 11:04 pm
Apple A16 Bionic chip SoC

The latest iteration of Apple’s iPhone has less than two months in the market, and we’re already receiving information about its successor. The new iPhone 14 could feature a new Apple A16 Bionic chip under the hood, and rumors suggest that this new processor may come to life using a 4nm process. This claim goes against previous info saying that Cupertino would use 3nm architecture on its next Bionic Soc.

According to a report from Digitimes, the new iPhone 14 will arrive with a new Apple A16 Bionic chip based on a 4nm process, which means that the new chipset would have a smaller procedure than Apple’s 5nm processors packed in the iPhone 13 and the previous iPhone 12 lineups.

Cupertino’s latest A14 Bionic chip is responsible for powering the company’s latest iPad Air and the iPhone 12. This chipset was created using a 5nm process, which made us believe, at some point, the latest A15 Bionic chip was going to use a 4nm process. However, things didn’t go as expected, and the latest Bionic SoC was created using a slightly improved 5nm process to make it better and more power-efficient. This also made room for speculation, as some believed that Apple would skip 4nm processes to use a 3nm process on the next Apple A16 Bionic chip.

Apple iPhone 13

However, a report from The Information told us that Apple’s partner TSMC is facing technical challenges to produce a 3nm chip, which may be the main reason why Apple would’ve decided to stick with a 4nm process in next year’s iPhone lineup. Earlier reports suggested that Cupertino had already booked all TSMC’s production capacity for the 3nm process to make chipsets for future iPhone of Mac computers. Still, we’re several months away from the launch of the iPhone 14, and many things can happen before then. Whatever the case, remember to take this rumor with some salt.

Via MacRumors

 

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