iOS

Apple stops supporting iPhone 5 for repairs, will begin vintage scheme

Apple has decommissioned another one of its products from the repair line due to old age, but it and others of the past may still remain repairable by the company.

Macotakara of Japan was first to spot that the iPhone 5 has now been classified as “vintage” in the United States and “obsolete” in the rest of the world. The US-exclusive “vintage” classification also applies to the iPhone 4 CDMA version and the iPhone 3GS, both devices with 8GB storage disks.

Separately, sources to 9to5Mac claim that the “vintage” flag will have a more apparent purpose in coming days as Apple is bound to introduce a “Repair Vintage Apple Products” pilot program, expanding the amount of time Apple will support repairs for its older devices.

Products will usually go “vintage” after manufacturing has stopped for 5 years. After 7 years, they become “obsolete.” A full list of products as well as exclusions due to local laws can be found here.

The publication listed these products as first to be eligible under the pilot program:

  • iPhone 5 (GSM/CDMA)
  • MacBook Air (11 inch, Mid 2012)
  • MacBook Air (13 inch, Mid 2012)
  • iMac (21.5 inch, Mid 2011) – US and Turkey only
  • iMac (27 inch, Mid 2011) – US and Turkey only

Further devices will be introduced into the pilot in phases:

November 30

  • iPhone 4s
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012)

December 30

  • iPhone 5 (GSM)
  • Mac Pro (Mid 2012)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2013)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, Mid 2012)

Apple and authorized service providers will be able to order parts for repair of these devices, depending on their availability — some components will be especially limited in stock.

Stay tuned for further updates if and once Apple announces the program.

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About The Author
Jules Wang
Jules Wang is News Editor for Pocketnow and one of the hosts of the Pocketnow Weekly Podcast. He came onto the team in 2014 as an intern editing and producing videos and the podcast while he was studying journalism at Emerson College. He graduated the year after and entered into his current position at Pocketnow, full-time.