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What’s actually new in Android 5.0.2?

By Stephen Schenck December 22, 2014, 1:44 pm

Google rounded-out last week by making its latest system software available for the 2012 Nexus 7. The tablet was in need of an update, having seen the Nexus 9, Nexus 10, and 2013 Nexus 7 all get their Android 5.0.1 updates while it was still on 5.0. But that’s not what it got at all, and instead we saw Google drop the tablet’s factory image for Android 5.0.2. With no formal announcement, we were left in the dark as to just what the presence of 5.0.2 meant, and how it might differ from 5.0.1. Now we’re starting to put the pieces together, as a series of AOSP commits reveal what happened between 5.0.1 and 5.0.2.

Unsurprisingly, given the tiny version number bump, there’s not a heck of a lot that’s new here. That’s not to say that the changes aren’t important, but rather than new features or anything so visible, there’s a lot of cleaning-up, bug-fix type improvements.

A couple changes deal with how Android handles internal alarms, which apps use to schedule tasks. In particular, Android is now better about waking the CPU when alarms need it to. There’s also a fix for an incomplete feature that was supposed to prevent simultaneous alarms from competing for system resources.

Another fix concerns how Android cleans up flash file system allocation: the TRIM process was supposed to run while charging overnight, but if you had your device fully turned off or charged it during the day, you were out of luck. Android 5.0.2 makes sure to do its TRIM duties next time the hardware boot-cycles if it’s gone a few days without running it.

There are some other little changes, but that’s about it for the notable ones. That’s 5.0.2 for you: a few valuable fixes, but nothing game-changing.

Source: Funky Android
Via: Android Police

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