Google I/O 2020 is the last major event that got canceled but it doesn’t mean the company’s plans are too. Last year, Google started a new trend by announcing a less expensive version of its flagship Pixel phones, with the Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL.

Google is expected to follow the same trend this year as well, and the images you see above and below are allegedly depicting the upcoming Google Pixel 4a.

If the images are legit, we can spot a punch hole on the top left, which would be a first for Pixel phones, regular or a-class. By consequence, gone is the top bezel, but the bottom chin is still somewhat visible.

Around the back we spot a fingerprint scanner dead center, as well as what appears to be a single camera with an LED flash arranged diagonally in a square camera hump.

Google introduced the Pixel 3a and 3a XL models in May of 2019, and we expect the timeframe to be more or less the same this year with the Pixel 4a.

Also, if 2019 is of any indication, we should see some serious leaks happening in the coming months, as the Pixel 3a (most Pixels, really) was pretty much all but revealed (thanks to leaks) by the time of the announcement.

Source: Slashleaks

Anton is the Editor-in-Chief of Pocketnow. As publication leader, he aims to bring Pocketnow even closer to you. His vision is mainly focused on, and oriented towards, the audience. Anton’s ambition, adopted by the entire team, is to transform Pocketnow into a reference media outlet. Contact: [email protected]
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