Posts tagged with: wifi calling
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    The Apple beta machine is hard at work cranking out new releases, and just like clockwork going back the past month now, every two weeks we've been seeing the distribution of a new iOS 9.3 beta. The company's still not quite to the point where it's ready for the big 9.3 public release, but today we see it get one step closer with the release of iOS 9.3 beta 3, landing alongside tvOS 9.2 beta 3 and watchOS 2.2 beta 3. So, what's new? Well, Night Shift has been a key component of iOS 9.3 betas so far, and this time is no exception. Apple continues to tweak the interface users will interact ...

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    AT&T kicked off a flurry of carrier interest in WiFi-based voice calls last month when it petitioned the FCC for regulatory approval to work around existing voice-call rules for hearing-impaired users and implement its own WiFi-friendly system. The FCC was quick to give AT&T the go-ahead, and just days later we saw the carrier formally launch WiFi calling with iPhone support. Verizon execs sure seemed to have taken notice of AT&T's actions, and later in October we learned that the carrier had petitioned the FCC for its own WiFi-call-enabling waiver. Today we get word that the ...

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    Earlier this month, AT&T reached out to the FCC in an effort to get started with offering WiFi-based calling. Whereas T-Mobile and Sprint just kinda dove right in, regulatory approval be damned, AT&T wanted to double-check that it was doing things the right way, especially when it came to delivering services for hearing-impaired customers. The FCC thought that AT&T's proposal sounded good, and in a matter of days we saw FCC approval arrive, followed immediately by AT&T getting WiFi calls started for iPhone users. Verizon must have paying attention to AT&T's actions, and ...

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    The past few days have been busy ones for AT&T's efforts to offer its subscribers WiFi-call support, letting them route voice calls and text messages over local WiFi connections in places where the cellular connection just isn't strong enough. After petitioning the FCC for a regulatory waiver, yesterday AT&T announced it had gotten the go-ahead from the agency. Like a starter pistol firing, that development has sent AT&T out on a sprint to get its new feature active and promoted, and today the carrier invites users of recent iPhone models to get started with WiFi calling for ...

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    For all the efforts cellular operators undertake to improve the quality and breadth of their networks, sometimes you just can't seem to lock on to a strong signal. Whether that's because you're out in the country, or so deep in the urban jungle that signals struggle to penetrate through to your forty-third-floor cubicle, it's always nice to have a backup plan. If you've got a fast local network, WiFi can pick up that slack in a pinch, and if your carrier also supports WiFi-based calling, you can even stay in touch with full voice coverage. Last week we heard about AT&T's efforts to ...

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    Voice calling feels like such a hold-over from a previous era of communication, that it's no wonder carriers are eager to modernize things. For some, that means tech like voice over LTE, while others are turning their attention to WiFi-based calling as an alternative (and of course, there's overlap there, with carriers working on both). AT&T, from the sound of things, would love to make WiFi calls an option for its subscribers, only so far it hasn't gotten the regulatory approval it believes is necessary to get broad WiFi-call service started. In a new letter to the FCC, the carrier ...

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    With the arrival of iOS 8 last year, Apple's iPhone picked up a valuable new feature: WiFi calling. For users spending much of their days indoors, where cellular reception can be hit-and-miss, being able to route voice calls over a convenient WiFi connection can be a real lifesaver. So far, you've been able to take advantage of it in the US if you had an iPhone 5S, iPhone 5C, iPhone 6, or iPhone 6 Plus running on T-Mobile's network. That's great for TMo users, but what about the rest of us? Today millions of additional iPhone users start getting access to the the same capabilities, as the ...

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    Technology sites like Pocketnow often focus on carrier coverage and wireless technologies made available through the cellular towers that dot our landscape. We are constantly bombarded with acronyms: EDGE, GMRS, HSPA, Wi-Max, LTE, CDMA, GSM, and so on. That's all fine and good, but one technology we often overlook is WiFi. More often that we'd like to admit our "traditional" cellular coverage (voice and text) isn't ideal, but that's something that could be remedied through data networks. Local-area wireless networks have some distinct advantages over their wide-area cousins -- advantages ...

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    The introduction of a consumer-centric smartphone greatly changed the landscape of mobile communication. Prior to the smartphone, voice calling was still largely the primary form of communication, the quickest and easiest way to get in touch or stay in touch while on the go. Of course, the introduction of SMS (simple message service), which allowed cell phone users to send 160 character messages back and forth, changed that. And email-enabled BlackBerrys and PDAs also changed the course for mobile communication once again. But the eventual introduction of the modern smartphone is what ...

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    It's an alluring concept: pay $19 per month (plus tax), get unlimited voice calling, text messaging, and data access. On a smartphone. Sure, it might run an older version of Android on dated, costly hardware, but it's still a smartphone. With an unlimited plan. Without a contract. For 19 smackers a month. That's the dream North Carolina-based carrier Republic Wireless is trying to deliver on with its new pricing scheme, a rate plan buried in taglines heavy on the word "freedom." Competing wireless carriers in the United States typically charge three to five times as much for their ...

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