Posts tagged with: wi-fi
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    The original NVIDIA Shield Tablet had Android Marshmallow coming to it. The update was billed as not having much adulteration, but it was apparently not tinkered around with enough. Shield owners who have received the update have reportedly lost Wi-Fi connection. The company posted in its forums that it was stopping the OTA roll-out to investigate why those problems are happening. It has suggested to those affected that they should reboot, then factory reset, then powering off their tablets for a few hours. Users then subsequently found that the Wi-Fi MAC address set to 02:00:00:00:00:00, ...

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    Isn't it annoying to scroll down the YouTube comments of a video and see "FIRST" pop out at number seven or eight? And even if it really is the first comment, shouldn't it really be a statement about something? Qualcomm made such a statement today. In its CES event, chief executive Steven Mollenkopf said that the LeTV Max Pro will be the first smartphone to sport the Snapdragon 820 chipset. Not only does this turn the page on what would questionably be a dark spot in the company's mobile application processor legacy with the Snapdragon 810, but it also puts to bed rumors that Samsung had ...

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    Connecting disparate, limited-function devices together so that they can work as such is about to get a bit easier. The Bluetooth SIG is working on its own standards, of course, but the Wi-Fi Alliance is looking to extend its own engendering protocols, too. Enter Wi-Fi HaLow, a less resource-intensive standard that uses not only the 2.4 and 5 GHz stripes traditionally set for Wi-Fi, but also the 900MHz band. In addition to better range overall, we would also be getting better object penetration as well. This tech's mainly intended for use with Internet of Things devices. But hey, making ...

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    Twitter leaker LlabTooFeR spotted a Wi-Fi Alliance certificate for the HTC One X9. This device, which would follow on the One A9, has been a hot topic among leakers in the mobile tech industry. We've been wondering about the chipset this supposed high-end-turned-mid-range phone would have and now we have a clue. LlabTooFeR believes that the model number listed is concurrent with the "E56ML" codename and "HTC One X9" moniker. In the full document (that you can download below), the MT6630 is listed as the Wi-Fi component. MediaTek first introduced the MT6630 with the octa-core MT6595 ...

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    Internet connectivity while travelling across the country is kinda tough. If you don't have unlimited data and a good Wi-Fi hotspot data stash, you're left clinging to airports, restaurants, city parks and hotels. Sometimes, at nasty costs. If that weren't enough, Hilton Hotels made it harder for those who had their own Wi-Fi hotspots to use them at their lodging resorts — just to corral them over to its paid internet services. Turns out, the Federal Communications Commission hates that kind of thing. And with an investigation dragging out way too long since we first reported on it last ...

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    We've been focusing on some high-level coverage in terms of the future technology we might be using and on what standards we'll be using them on. Our Jaime Rivera reported on AT&T's blueprint for Internet of Things devices during CTIA. Another "out there" thing we're looking at is the proliferation of unlicensed LTE spectrum or LTE-U, as it's known. These bits of spectrum are typically in the 5GHz range, really intended for network coverage around arenas, parks and other compact, high-density spaces. If you're familiar with Wi-Fi, you know that it also uses that specific band and it's ...

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    By now it should be pretty clear that we're all carrying around full-featured computers in our pockets. Just like the desktop and laptop computers that we've used for years, our mobile devices have the same features and functionality as their full-sized counterparts - sometimes even more: microphones, cameras, broadband Internet connections, and more. One of the main areas of concern is that our smartphones and tablets are "always on" and "always connected" to the Internet. Combined, these present many threats that most users  may not even realize. Not to worry! Here are a few android ...

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    Wi-Fi is one of the greatest technological advancements of our time. Networking without wires, and without the need for a large deployment of towers and antennae. It's relatively fast and very easy to set up by average people: just plug in a couple wires, and tap a "connect" button on the router and the device to be paired. Range, however, is limited to around 1,000-feet -- under perfect conditions. The advantages of Wi-Fi might also be considered weaknesses. Public places that offer free Wi-Fi are regularly inundated with far too many people trying to access the network and bandwidth ...

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    Advertising. Love it or hate it, it's here to stay. We see ads on TV, we see ads in magazines and newspapers, we see ads on our favorite websites. We see billboards. We hear ads on the radio. We can't escape them. This inundation of advertisements, however, is a marketer's nightmare. How can you target your potential customers without wasting money on people who don't care? When advertising your goods or services, you don't want to spend money where it's not going to be effective, but how can you know where it's being effective?  With so many options -- and so many competing ...

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    A number of years ago, I remember reading an article in an old-timey magazine (the kind with pages that you flip, which I no longer like very much) about how some car manufacturers were building proximity sensors into their new high-end models. These sensors would monitor the area in front of the car for objects -like, say, the rear bumper of another vehicle up ahead- and if they detected that you were approaching too quickly, the car's computer system would automatically apply the brakes in time to avert a collision. Back when I read that article, I remember that sounding like an ...

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    Some holes, like this one in Yellowstone National Park, are beautiful. But take a look at your phone or tablet. How many holes does it have in it? None of them are "pretty". Let's face it,  they're eyesores. Holes seem like they are necessary components, but they do make your phone look ugly. Additionally, they're extra components which just add on to the cost of an already pricey piece of electronics. Let's count them, shall we? Chances are you've got a headphone jack, a microUSB port, and maybe even an MHL/HDMI port. Why? Why do we have so many holes in our devices? Aren't there other ...

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    With recent polls showing that people use their phones less and less for calling, data is becoming more important than it's ever been. It's no longer the slow EDGE (or even GPRS) experience that some of use may remember from yesteryear. Now we have WiMax, HSPA+, and LTE. All are powerhouses when it comes to speed, some faster than others, that have let us move further away from the computer and more toward our smartphones and tablets for all our data needs. What about Wi-Fi? The question goes back a long, long way: which is better, Wi-Fi or cellular data? Wi-Fi, or more officially, 802.11 ...

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