Posts tagged with: user interface
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    I like Windows Phone. No, really. I do. Most of you jump to conclusions and call me a hater because I can see flaws in products and tell it like it is. At the end of the day, I love all mobile platforms – maybe not as equally as I should sometimes. But I definitely love mobile software, and I'm a sucker for an underdog. So, yes, I like Windows Phone. I tried the first few Windows Phone 7 handsets, I owned the Lumia 900 on launch day, and I drooled over the 920 at the press event. However, I haven't been able to take the platform for more than a few days at a time since the beginning … ...

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    We recently had the opportunity to review the Sony Xperia Tablet Z, an experience we enjoyed primarily because of the device's innovative hardware: a 6.9mm-thick, 495g chassis that manages to squeeze water- and dust-resistance onto its list of features. Pocketnow is currently in the midst of reviewing the BlackBerry Q10, a peculiar blend of yesterday's design cues with a modern OS - and we're enjoying the feeling of real physical keys under our thumbs again. The third-generation Apple iPad and Microsoft's Surface RT also share space in our office, and we love the sturdy (if heavy) hardware ...

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    Interface design on mobile platforms has undergone some massive improvements and countless changes since the beginning of smartphones. Mobile operating systems in the BlackBerry era were heavily engineered and barely had the warm touch of a designer well-versed in user experience, if at all. It had a hint of an "Oh, that looks good … let's use that!" feel. Icons weren't a uniform size, nor did they have any sort of theme. The BlackBerry Settings app was nothing but a stark, bare text list of settings that stretched several pages deep. To say it was convoluted is putting it lightly. In ...

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    If I were prone to beating dead horses, I'm sure I could hammer out a handful of wordy editorials about how iOS is boring, dated, and in dire need of a face-lift. But I don't like beating anything, especially not something as futile and helpless as a horse that's already dead. Let's look at the situation from another perspective for a minute, shall we? It's no secret. The interface has grown very long in the tooth and reeks of UI design of years past. In regards to iOS, there's little to get excited over anymore. That's evidenced by the fact that despite nearing one million applications in ...

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    The Android interface has drastically changed over the last six years. Few of us care to recall the days of Gingerbread, where the operating system was accented with two contrasting colors – neon orange and green – and an uninspired interface. Dare we think back to FroYo and beyond, where the notification shade was an odd shade of light gray (slightly 0ff-white) and the app drawer was literally a drawer that had to be opened by a upward finger swipe. Matias Duarte, Google's Director of Android User Experience, has worked his magic with Android. Since he joined the ranks, the interface ...

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    Those of you who've followed my writing for a while know that I'm a refugee from the Great webOS Collapse of 2011, and there's still a lot I miss and love about the platform. While I try to write about it as often as I can, the sad truth is there's not a lot of news about the "little OS that couldn't" these days - things are pretty quiet as it marches toward open source. So I'm kind of waiting along with everyone else for that to wrap up this fall. Until then, though, I'm still using webOS somewhat often via my HP TouchPad. Sometimes I even pull the tiny HP Veer out of storage and relive ...

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    You know what we haven't had in a while? A good old-fashioned #firstworldproblems rant. So here's one. As Q might say, the world of smartphones has always been "wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires both subtle and gross" (just making sure you're awake, Trek fans). That magical quality has grown over the years -in fact, Apple effectively co-opted the term "magical" for a while there- and today our portable devices are capable of incredible feats. Along the way, we've lost some things. Progress inevitably demands that certain features be obsoleted in favor of others. The jog dial, or ...

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