Posts tagged with: USB 3.1
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    Okay, before you scroll like mad down to the source link, please, at least let us have a chance to give some context for you. Michael Fisher is known for complaining about how devices that support Micro-USB Type-C will devilishly decline his old Type B cables. But the convenience of not having to recklessly damage your non-reversible Micro-USB jack or port (in committing the crime of plugging in your charger in the dark) is there. And a firm called Codistas has answered to this demand by creating a reversible Type B port. The magic Codistas worked into the "Micro-Flip" connector is ...

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    When USB was first released there were basically two types of connectors: the one that you plugged into your computer (which hasn't changed all that much over the years); and the one that you plugged into your printer, scanner, or other peripheral. The latter was somewhat square and looked kind of like a little house, and was fairly easy to plug in. The former was rectangular, and a pain the in neck to plug in correctly the first time around. As the standard evolved, that "house" connector proved to be too big to use in any small devices - especially smartphones. Mini-USB was developed. ...

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    Say what you will about the problems inherent to using a non-industry-standard connector like Apple's elected to use with Lightning on its latest iOS devices: for all the unnecessary compatibility issues that creates, there's something incredibly graceful about Lightning's ability to be inserted with no concerns for which way is up. Since late last year we've been talking about similar functionality coming to a connector that really would be a cross-manufacturer, cross-platform standard, with word that USB 3.1 would introduce a reversible "Type-C" connector. Work's been underway to ...

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    Printers from yesteryear used parallel ports. Modems used serials ports -- which were available in either 9- or 25-pin varieties. High-speed devices like scanners and external drives used to connect via any number of SCSI connections. A company I used to work for even made products that let you daisy-chain two together via parallel port, and even came out with a drive that you could plug into either a parallel port or a 25-pin SCSI port. Even common devices like keyboards and mice connected through a PS/2 or other style connector. Put another way, there were just far too many kinds of ...

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