Posts tagged with: unlimited
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    The Electronic Frontier Foundation, which laid accusations against T-Mobile's Binge On zero-rate program not being net neutral, is calling out said T-Mobile again for more bits of anti-net neutrality. This time, its targeting T-Mobile One, the carrier's new one-for-all unlimited data plan. Senior staff technologist Jeremy Gillula believes that an extra $25 per month to bypass speed throttling on streaming video, music and gaming is a no-go in terms of the FCC's Open Internet Order. "From what we've read thus far it seems like T-Mobile's new plan to charge its customers extra to not ...

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    T-Mobile has had an undeniably admirable hustle hype when it comes to its Simple Global offering. It punched up free calls, texts and unlimited high-speed data in Europe right after Brexit and in Brazil just before the Olympics. Well, it's the week of the opening ceremonies and Sprint is tailing the Un-carrier with a service bump of its own. As part of its Sprint Open World program, it is opening up high-speed data from 1GB to unlimited for everyone there in the month of August. That's in addition to free calls and texts already provided on the program. Sprint Open World is available as a ...

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    T-Mobile raised its monthly plan rates last year as it introduced its Binge On zero-rate program. While it offered more data per tier and more hotspot data at that, the unlimited data package ended up starting at $95 from its previous $80. Currently, two lines of unlimited data come to $140 per month. Sprint's offering a $120 rate for the same thing. But it could dive even deeper if that carrier's trial offers of the "Unlimited Freedom Plan" expand nationwide. That takes the base rate for two lines of unlimited data down to $100 per month. But according to those in the know at the Sprint ...

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    Update: Ars Tehnica is reporting an official ceiling of 100GB. The Verizon Plan for business at 100GB currently costs $450 per month. The grandfathered plans cost $49.99 per month. If you are still clinging hard to that old, overpriced and out-of-contract Verizon unlimited data plan... you're going to have to use less data and cling harder. Use less data, huh? Maybe that won't even be enough. From sources to Droid Life, it seems that will have to be the case come tomorrow when the carrier's "Unlimited Data Plan Migration" scheme will take effect. Verizon will contact account holders ...

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    The base rate for an unlimited data plan on T-Mobile is $95 per month. On Sprint, it's $75. Spread that difference over two years and you've got enough money for another good phone if you wanted it. The Now Network feels it's important to point that out in this micro-age of Pokémon GO madness, even as the Un-carrier is offering unlimited high-speed data to all of its customers for a year while on the app. "Unlike some of the other carriers, Sprint offers unlimited data at a fair price so you don't have to worry about using data while Playing Pokémon Go," Sprint stated in a press ...

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    If you're a Pokémon GO fan, here's a T-Mobile Tuesdays offer you'll wish that the Un-carrier won't screw up. On July 19, T-Mobile will use its customer appreciation program serve up new perks revolving around your travels related to the Pokémon GO game. First and foremost of the perks is unlimited high-speed data for Pokémon GO use — that means that even if you dump the game next week, you can pick it back up in October and not have to worry about using up your data bucket. In fact, the offer lasts through the end of next August as long as you claim it on any given Tuesday through ...

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    Limitations suck. Whether we're paying more for that over-mileage leased car, standing in the long line at the supermarket because we have eleven items, or having to check that slightly-too-large bag at the airport, it's no fun having to put up with added hassle just because you wanted a little more. This is doubly true for wireless data, and whether the consequences are added fees or reduced speed, going over your monthly data cap can be a real headache. That's what makes unlimited plans so alluring, but many carriers have been anything but willing to offer them. It's especially rare when ...

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    Is money no object in the way of unlimited data? Well, if you and Verizon still want to be together forever, it's just going to have to cost more. Some subscribers found this out for themselves last November as their bills went up by $20, bringing their monthly tabs up to $49.99. Add on voice and SMS services and those bills could easily hit about $100. If you weren't hit with that price hike on November 15, but still have an unlimited plan with Verizon, call a representative and ask if you should be expecting a price hike on May 15 (or whenever your bill cycle resets after that date). ...

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    Update: A T-Mobile spokesperson has clarified the suggestion that CFO Braxton Carter was announcing the end of unlimited data plans on the carrier. He is, in fact, referring to the "limited time" offer of the unlimited data family plan (wherein the first three lines cost $50 per month with the fourth line free). We went back and traced the question asked to Carter: On the pricing front, so [...] one of the bull cases for wireless more recently has been the ability to monetize accelerating data traffic in a paper-use type model. If we think about pricing, about how competitive it's been of ...

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    Nobody likes living under the pressure of constantly looming restrictions, and that's especially true when it comes to our mobile data. Maybe you'd love to stream a little HD video on the train home from work, but with your monthly usage already pushing dangerously close to your data cap, you resentfully settle for another few rounds of Candy Crush – no good at all. It used to be that unlimited data plans were relatively easy to come by, but it wasn't long before carriers started second-guessing themselves on just how much profit they stood to make from such offerings, and swiftly killed ...

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    As time goes on, and technology improves, it only gets cheaper and cheaper to deliver reliable, high-speed internet access, right? We'll wait a moment for you to stop laughing. Back in the day, wireless providers were keen to keen to lure in users with the promise of unlimited data at affordable rates, but in the years since we've seen many of those offers dry up. Nowadays, if you're lucky enough to have one of those grandfathered old unlimited accounts, you're going to be paying a hell of a lot for the same kind of access to data – and often with a whole lot of restrictions. AT&T ...

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    When you sell users “unlimited” data plans, they sure expect a lot – and why wouldn't they? But carriers aren't hooking users up with such massive buckets of data out of the goodness of their hearts, and recently we've been seeing a number of networks start bumping up the rates for their unlimited plans. Verizon got this ball rolling in early October as we heard about unlimited data climbing $20 to $50 (for data alone). T-Mobile wasn't far behind with its own price increase, and under the banner of Simple Choice Amped we saw its existing $80 unlimited plan rise to $95. AT&T isn't ...

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    Nobody likes thinking twice every time they download an app, stream a video, or upload a photo to the cloud: am I still going to have enough data left this month? Sure, they can be hard to come by these days, but there's a lot of appeal to the idea of unlimited data plans, freeing us to take full advantage of everything our smartphones can offer. So when a carrier starts talking about a new unlimited data offering, and one with an incredibly low price, we find our interest quickly piqued. Today Sprint announced just such a plan, promising unlimited data for as low as $20 a month. If that ...

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    Go shopping for a smartphone service plan with an unlimited data allowance these days, and you're going to find your options pretty limited. It wasn't always this way, however, and back in the earlier days of smartphones, carriers found themselves quite a bit more willing to sell users a carte blanche pass to consume as much data as their mobile devices could. And while carriers like AT&T and Verizon have long stopped offering unlimited data to new subscribers, existing users have been able to hold on to their treasured plans. Those doing so on Verizon may soon find themselves paying a ...

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    It's such a simple word, “unlimited.” Yet far, far too often when we're using it in the context of smartphones and mobile data, it means anything but. Instead, “unlimited” plans still bind you to restrictive terms of service (prohibiting things like running a server over your wireless connection), ban “excessive use,” or start throttling your speeds after a certain point. Here in the US, the FTC has had its eye out for carriers who advertise “unlimited” data but give their users something that falls short, with AT&T catching the agency's wrath last fall. Today we're ...

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    Finally, after years of you and I telling them so, mainstream carriers are starting to offer "unlimited" plans. Why the "air quotes"? Because even though we're told they're "unlimited", these plans still have "limits". We had unlimited mobile to mobile minutes (but not to land lines or to people on other carriers), then unlimited talk time (but only on the weekends and after 7pm). Eventually we got unlimited texting (which we really should have had all along, but that's another article entirely). The odd-ball has always been data. Some plans offered a few hundred megabytes of data, others ...

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    T-Mobile has been my cellular carrier since before they were T-Mobile. Yes, I'm a VoiceStream guy! Anyone remember those days? I picked VoiceStream because (1) they were all digital, (2) they used an international standard, (3) I could switch to any other phone just by swapping the SIM card, and (4) they were less expensive than anyone else. They also had fairly limited coverage and you couldn't stray far from big cities or Interstate highways without losing signal. That was fine with me, I was covered 90% of the time. Since then "regular" phones have become "smart phones" and our cellular ...

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