Posts tagged with: TouchWiz UX Nature
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    My mother-in-law isn't exactly what you'd call "technologically savvy", but that doesn't stop her from upgrading to the latest and greatest Android-powered smartphones every chance she gets. Normally, this wouldn't be a problem, but I'll give you three guesses who gets to support those devices. It wouldn't be such an issue except at her age -- how can I put this lightly -- she's a bit "set in her ways". Don't get me wrong, she can whip out her phone and call anyone in her extremely wide social network faster than you can say "mint chocolate chip ice cream". She's got friends and relatives ...

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    I've had some wonderful experiences with Android tablets. Loading CyanogenMod on the HP TouchPad, an activity I documented in my first-ever video for Pocketnow, filled in some crucial capability gaps left open by the TouchPad's native OS. Carrying a first-gen Nexus 7 for a week in 2012 taught me just how compelling Jelly Bean in the 7-inch form factor could be. And spending some time last year with the Sony Xperia Tablet Z convinced me that "elegance" and "Android tablet" were no longer mutually-exclusive terms. We've come a long way from the days of Honeycomb and the XYBOARD. But five ...

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    Most new device launches go the same way: usually the press gets review units before they’re widely available, and we get to use them for a few days -or a week if we’re lucky- as we work on our review. Then press day arrives. The embargo on media coverage lifts, and everyone posts their reviews and videos at the same time. It’s a huge frenzy, commenters go nuts, and it’s a giant explosion of frantic opinion-sharing activity. For about … a day. And then it all goes away. Sure, there’s followup coverage as people find bugs and hidden features, but after that initial blast, not ...

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    Yesterday, I recounted my experience re-adopting stock Android after an extended period using skinned builds of the platform. Since the vehicle for my reintroduction to the stock lifestyle was the Google-Edition HTC One, I spent the majority of my time in that editorial comparing the device with its skinned sibling, running the third-party UI called HTC Sense. But Sense isn't the only Android layer of note in the marketplace; quite the contrary, in fact. As of February, almost half of all Android smartphones shipped came from Samsung, and almost all of those ran a version of Samsung's ...

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    Before we begin, we'd just like to say something to everyone who's going to call us out for click-baiting with that "Galaxy S 5" title: your allegations are completely founded and true. But look here: even though Galaxy S 5 rumors are (to say the least) premature and indicative of a serious problem with our nasty-fast industry -an issue we discuss on the air- they're also important. That's because, as unreliable and, frankly, stupid as they are, they also give us an opportunity to discuss the future of Samsung industrial design. And any opportunity we get to talk about the Galaxy family in ...

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    There is a zone, somewhere between the initial review frenzy surrounding a brand-new smartphone and our After The Buzz re-review, where a followup is called for. A check-in period. A built-in hold to allow the reviewers to catch their breath while they pass the mic to the buyers for their impressions on a brand-new device. Not just any buyers, either, but that special class of customer that tells a critical part of any device's story: the early-adopters. The Samsung Galaxy S 4 started shipping last month. It's been available on all four U.S. national carriers for about a week now, giving ...

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    The Galaxy S 4 ships with more sensors than it knows what to do with. As we described in our full review, the new Samsung superphone boasts a thermometer, barometer, and even a hygrometer beneath its glazed polycarbonate shell, making the device almost as much tricorder as communicator. But sensors are only as good as the apps that can make use of their data. Realizing this, one talented developer has emerged to provide a software companion for Samsung's sensors, an app to give voice to these less-celebrated Galaxy S4 features. That app is called Weather Station. And while it won't win any ...

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    You've been asking for it: a head-to-head matchup of the best of Windows Phone with (one of) the best of Android. We had to get the hotter comparisons out of the way first, but here for your viewing enjoyment is the latest piece of Nokia versus Samsung hotness to come out of Pocketnow. Why the delay? Funny you should ask. We've been churning out quad-vs-octa, Samsung-vs-HTC, and Galaxy-vs-Galaxy comparisons first because, at the moment, they're the more apt head-to-heads. Nokia's Lumia 920 is a half-year old at this point, and the truth is, putting it up against the newest Samsung ...

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    The Galaxy S 4 comes packing a wide array of features. Some, like its flip-to-mute functionality, are minor but useful. Others, like the Smart Pause function that promises to interrupt playback when you look away from a playing video, are great ideas sullied by lackluster execution. And between those two extremes lies a dense field of additional functions. We tried to squeeze as much feature coverage as we could into our full review of the Galaxy S 4, but there's only so much room in even the densest Pocketnow review articles. Here, then, is a video walkthrough of the Galaxy S 4's unique ...

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    There are a lot of things the fourth smartphone in Samsung's halo Galaxy S series is not.  It's not a reinvention, or a revolution. If it were a movie, the Galaxy S 4 wouldn't be the blockbuster revival of a flagging film franchise: the reboot that kicks a sagging series back into high gear. That's because the Galaxy S line has never been a disappointing one. For years, Samsung's flagship smartphone series has dominated the Android landscape, making the word "Galaxy" synonymous with Google's platform in much of the public vernacular. Last year's Galaxy S III accelerated that trend, ...

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    Sometimes ya ain't got time for dilly-dallyin', spit-swappin', or tall-tale-tellin'. Sometimes even dropping in a few time codes is too much to ask. Because sometimes the meat just needs to get out to the masses. This is one of those special times, and the meat we're putting on the market is our jawing. Our opinions. Our stories. And the subject this week is the two biggest Android smartphone launches of the year, coming from the two biggest sworn enemies of the entire Android landscape. That's right: this is the episode where we talk HTC One vs Galaxy S IV. We've had the One for just a ...

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    What do you get when you cross the biggest, baddest Samsung hardware with the latest and greatest HTC superphone, the one everyone insists on mislabeling a phablet? You get this Galaxy Note II-vs-Droid DNA video, of course, except with the names inverted. Because in this biz, the new-hotness gets first-word respect. Dig? In the video below, we take the Note II and the DNA on a short spin around the block, comparing their benchmark scores, in-hand feel, app launch times, browser performance, and -of course- their massive displays. We don't yet know the DNA well enough to put its other ...

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    The Samsung Galaxy Note II phablet is right smack in the middle of its coming-out party, and we're hard at work on the full review. In the meantime, since we've compared it to the Galaxy S III and given an S Pen lesson already, alongside a few written editorials, we thought it only fitting we should hold the new Note up to its predecessor, the former king of phablets and the one that kicked off the whole category, to see where the newer model excels. Nothing much fancy going on in this quick-and-dirty comparison video; just a lot of side-by-side comparisons and close-up & medium shots ...

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    With a good enough camera, taking great pictures doesn't require you to be a professional photographer. Sure, that helps (a lot), but it's not strictly necessary. Especially if you have capable tools at your disposal, and enough knowhow to operate them. The Samsung Galaxy S III has the tools in abundance. Its 8MP backside-illuminated CMOS sensor with ƒ2.6 aperture size is a spec beast in the world of mobile-phone cameras. The software driving it is packed with enough features and shooting modes to boggle the mind. The question, then, is knowhow. I've been wrestling with the Galaxy S ...

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    One of the exciting things about Android is the ability for skilled community developers to dismantle and port stuff from one phone to the other. HTC Sense 4.0 was a big deal when the One family landed -- and there were also ports -- and now it is time for those who want a cleaner launcher to get Samsung's own TouchWiz UX Nature from the Galaxy S III to their Ice Cream Sandwich-powered phone. It has already been confirmed to work on a solid number of devices so your chances of success are rather high. You need to be rooted though; if you are, installation is as simple as dropping an APK ...

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    Back on Monday, we talked to you about Samsung's model GT-B5330, a portrait-mode QWERTY Android running ICS that was showing up in some benchmark listings. While it had an interesting look to it, the hardware details available didn't make it out to be a very impressive handset, and we weren't expecting Samsung to release it anywhere but Asia. Now, Samsung has officially announced the model, giving it the name Galaxy Chat, and though it still seems quite underpowered, the extra details Samsung has provided are serving to make the phone just a bit more attractive. Shortly after posting about ...

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    Eleven years ago this month, I bought my first mobile phone: a Samsung SCH-3500 on Sprint. At the time, it was the hottest device on the market; its unique form factor and high-tech features like voice dialing made it a must-have. The wireless landscape has since changed dramatically, but two things remain true: wireless customers still seek out groundbreaking devices, and the hottest phone on Sprint is still built by Samsung. The Galaxy S III is the latest Android superphone to come out of South Korea, and it has a lot going for it. Indeed, our own Brandon Miniman gave it high marks on ...

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    Samsung dropped a ton of features on us at the NYC launch event for the stateside arrival of the Galaxy S III. That's no surprise: the SGS3 is packing some of the most innovative -along with some of the most gimmicky- innovations seen in mobile in the past year. It's US variant is no different, bringing offerings like Smart Stay, Buddy Photo Share, and yes, S Voice to we Americans one carrier at a time. Those features are part of the custom TouchWiz 5 experience Samsung has crafted for the Galaxy S III; they function independently of other products and work right out of the box. But there ...

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    Gestures in the smartphone world are nothing new, and neither is our commentary on them. Jaime Rivera wrote an iOS-focused editorial about the future of gestures in smartphone interfaces over a year ago, and last spring, Joe Levi took us on a brief video tour of third-party Android apps making use of gesture-based controls. Since I joined the team, Pocketnow has featured some more mentions of the late, great webOS, which featured generous use of non-button-based input. Indeed, Samsung seemed to take notice of webOS when crafting its new Galaxy S III. The world's top handset ...

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    U.S. variants of the Samsung Galaxy S III have been announced (and anticipated) on AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon. Some carrier subscribers were luckier than others but Verizon fans seem to have to wait forever for their phone to be available. Initially, the Verizon Galaxy S III should have been available on July 9, which was before it got pushed back one day to July 10. Then came rumors of a July 11 availability -- later confirmed by Verizon on their website with the patches on the phone -- and the latest report comes from HHGregg who have a nice banner up on their page that says ...

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    Visually, they're almost indistinguishable. Aside from a carrier logo and a barely perceptible tint of the white polycarbonate underneath the "hyperglaze" coating, these Galaxy S III devices are identical twins. But looks, as they say, are only skin deep. One of these is the unlocked international version of Samsung's newest powerhouse, while the other is the just-released North American variant (Sprint's, in this case). Look under the hood and you'll find some significant differences, and not just in the radio either: the international device packs a Samsung Exynos quad-core CPU supported ...

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    No one can really question the success of the Galaxy series of smartphones from Samsung. Numbers represent an ever-growing tendency from the initial Galaxy S to the Galaxy S II (and Galaxy Note). The South Korean company is determined to capitalize on that buzz as it expects record sales for its current flagship, the Galaxy S III. JK Shin, head of telecommunications at Samsung, expects more than ten million Galaxy S III units sold in July, Reuters reports. While it isn't clear what the wording "cumulative sales" is referring to (sales to customers, sales to retailers, sales to carriers, or ...

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    The Samsung Galaxy S III is without a doubt one of the most (if not the most) popular Android smartphone of the moment and the International version has been already rooted with CyanogenMod 9 Nightlies available for the power users. However, users in the U.S., especially subscribers to one of the carriers that have the phone in their line-up can now also join the root party. The Samsung Galaxy S III on AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile has been rooted. The procedure is pretty much the same, including the use of Odin and flashing ClockworkMod but for specific files and instructions for each ...

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    After publishing the source yesterday for the AT&T and T-Mobile variants of the Galaxy S III, Samsung is now also pushing out the kernel for the Sprint flavor of the phone. It is available in the Samsung Open Source Release Center at the source link below for everyone to grab and dismantle. With three out of four already published, we are waiting for the Verizon Galaxy S III source to be published too. And, while we wait for the phones, we can sit back and let the developers do their thing with all the bits and pieces for us to flash, test and feed our addiction. Source: Samsung Open ...

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    Opposed to the International Samsung Galaxy S III which packs a quad-core Exynos SoC, the American variants -- including the AT&T and T-Mobile versions we're referring to here -- pack a Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 dual-core SoC but an additional gigabyte of RAM. You could see an initial face-off between them just a couple of hours ago and, at a first glance, there is no real difference between the phones. Samsung has made the source codes for the AT&T and T-Mobile variants public. This means that, from this point on, we can count down the days until super fast custom ROMs and ...

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