Posts tagged with: security
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    The iPhone belonging to a confessed drug dealer in Brooklyn has been cracked into. But it wasn't opened with the zero-day exploit that the FBI purchased supposedly from a gray hat hacker. Someone else just knew the passcode for the iPhone. Prosecutors in the case said that an unidentified person turned in the code. The Justice Department had been requesting for Apple's assistance in opening up the iPhone, running iOS 7, for months. This case pre-dates the San Bernadino debacle that brought the nation face-first into a public debate about privacy, security and encryption. The drug dealer ...

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    Update: The podcast is up now and will be sent out at 3pm Eastern on Friday. The HTC 10 makes us wonder if any phone can really be perfect. Galaxy Note 6 rumors are building steam. What might we see on Samsung's next phablet? With the flagship phone market maturing, we'll take a look at why people are waiting longer to upgrade their phones? We've been hard at work covering news stories and producing the next generation of phone reviews. We recently started a new series of videos delving deeper into camera performance and phone comparisons, and of course we'll be tackling your questions and ...

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    For many Android users, 2015 will go down in history as a sad year for the platform’s vulnerability protection, due mostly to a collection of mischievous software bugs known as Stagefright. But that’s all behind us now, and at least according to Google’s second Android security annual report, the remote code execution and privilege escalation troubles may have made the ecosystem stronger than before. Of course, there’s no mention of Stagefright in this latest “overview of new security protections introduced in 2015”, but it can’t be a coincidence the probability of an ...

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    From what we've been told, it seems that Apple had a fairly unsatisfying talk about how highly it puts security in front of its customers. Sure, there may have been some interesting new methods to show off here, but if we're to go by the conclusions one commentator who was at the technical briefing on Friday made, we may have something to chew over. Tech.pinions's Ben Bajarin made some observations from his attendance at the technical briefing. First off, a couple of carrots for us factoid chasers: iPhone users typically unlock their devices 80 times a day with heavier users unlocking ...

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    Update: The podcast will be on your podcatchers starting at 3am Eastern on April 16. Enjoy! The HTC 10 is taking the Android world by storm. Can this one phone turn the tides for HTC? Our LG G5 coverage is in full swing, and everything you want to know about this phone will be answered. Lastly, another "backdoor" encryption bill is headed to congress, what might this mean for consumer tech? We've been hard at work covering news stories and producing the next generation of phone reviews. We recently started a new series of videos delving deeper into camera performance and phone comparisons, ...

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    In addition to setting a dangerous precedent, compromising decades of diligent work in the service of user privacy protection, and possibly building a master key for all of the world’s iPhones that could always fall into the wrong hands, Apple’s supporters in its FBI deadlock also argued there was probably nothing relevant on Syed Farook’s handheld. Nothing about a supposed third San Bernardino assailant, nothing about other planned attacks or living terrorists affiliated with the two killed on December 2, 2015. And now, CBS News claims to have heard from a “law enforcement ...

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    In addition to being the most popular smartphone vendor around the globe by a landslide, and producing the two devices consumers and experts appear to agree are the best of the best, Samsung today adds another important gold medal to its increasingly crowded trophy room. This one’s a little unexpected, which probably makes the win that much sweeter, as we all tend to associate BlackBerry or Apple’s names first and foremost with top-drawer mobile security, impenetrable encryption, and data protection. But surprise, surprise, market research firm Gartner ranked Samsung Knox number one in ...

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    Apple might never get to find out exactly how law enforcement managed to elude its “impenetrable” iOS encryption on an iPhone 5c owned by a San Bernardino shooter at the time of the heinous 2015 attack, but another important piece of the unlocking puzzle may have just been uncovered. Forget everything you thought you knew about the nature and authors of the cyber-intrusion, as “people familiar with the matter” tell The Washington Post it was actually “professional hackers who discovered and brought to the bureau at least one previously unknown software flaw.” No Israeli ...

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    Oh, how it must sting that Apple needs law enforcement cooperation now, after so many adamant refusals of its own assistance in a very delicate and complex terrorist attack investigation! But hands down the most ironic thing about this point of Cupertino’s FBI dispute is the intelligence service can’t be compelled to disclose the hacking technique used on Syed Farook’s iPhone 5c. Tim Cook could always sue, which would be even more ironic, and argue a so-called “Vulnerabilities Equities Process” applies here. Unfortunately, that’s not exactly an official or legal act, but rather ...

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    All’s well that ends well. But has the colossal Apple – FBI squabble on delicate matters like device encryption, data protection and counter-terrorism efforts really ended well for both parties involved? At least one? Not exactly, and ultimately, this long, contested battle will probably go down in the history books as a tie. On one hand, the Cupertino-based tech giant stood its ground against the US Department of Justice, and evaded any definitive laws passed in Congress forcing it to comply with court orders in cases of private information extraction from iDevices. On the other, law ...

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    Tim Cook’s defense against the FBI in the now infamous San Bernardino iPhone 5c unlocking case has been as simple as it was reasonable from the get-go. There’s no way to decrypt just one phone without making sure the resulting “backdoor” wouldn’t be used on many other devices, and causing a precedent for law enforcement to then seek similar “assistance” in less serious investigations feels like a very bad idea. But while Apple avoided to make this argument for obvious reasons, there’s also the question of whether its encryption methods are truly impenetrable. Some security ...

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    The past couple of weeks have brought many software changes to Nexus devices, starting with the now traditional monthly security patches, then a long overdue bundle of stability and performance improvements designed specifically for the 5X and 6P. Unfortunately, something apparently messed up the two’s fingerprint scanners as well, and a system vulnerability rated as critical prompted Google to pull an unprecedented move. Repairing the flaw couldn’t wait until next month, so “supplemental Nexus updates are being created and will be released within a few days.” Just to be clear, ...

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    If Apple’s recent tussle with the FBI, US Department of Justice and other government organizations has made you more aware of mobile security, everyone’s go-to freemium password management service developer comes bearing good news today. Seeing as how over 90 percent of Android phones in use worldwide forgo basic encryption features, it’s always a good idea to add an extra layer of protection in case anyone cracks your various access passcodes to the device itself, email clients, financial apps and so on. Even on iOS, two-step verification is a safe measure of combatting privacy ...

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    If you perhaps wondered why US law enforcement insists so many iPhones seized in serious crime investigations be unlocked by Apple, with little to no mention of similar requests for Android handhelds, it turns out it’s not because iGear is more popular among criminals. Granted, government-funded institutions like the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health tend to distribute iPhones as work equipment to their employees, which indirectly led to the huge controversy regarding the Syed Farooq-owned 5c. Yes, the FBI’s access to data stored on the infamous device could have been ...

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    While Apple’s legal battles with the FBI, San Bernardino County, NYPD and US Department of Justice remain at a standstill, the tech giant’s many declared allies might be looking to take further action against potential government snooping on people’s private data and e-conversations. The world’s most popular messaging application in particular will reportedly add voice call encryption before long to a set of security features that already includes end-to-end text protection. WhatsApp would thus become essentially impenetrable from the ground up, and unless crystal clear laws are ...

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    As a presidential candidate that prides himself on “telling it like it is”, as well as his ‘uge dingus, Donald Trump has sure been caught lying a lot lately. Trump University is under scrutiny, and so was the Republican front-runner’s knowledge of David Duke and the former KKK Grand Wizard’s anti-Semitic views in recent weeks. On a much lighter note, Tim Cook should probably be relieved to hear the controversial but surging politician couldn’t stay away from his iPhone for more than a few weeks. Remember the Apple boycott he randomly pleaded for during a rally back in February ...

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    The FBI, San Bernardino County District Attorney, the local Police Department and all their highly-placed politician supporters have never been able to provide a very compelling argument for why a specific iPhone 5c owned by a terrorist needs to be decrypted. Until Friday, that is, when San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan made a fairly solid case for the unlocking of the device for the sake of clarity. Clarity regarding the number of December 2, 2015 assailants. According to Burguan, “the majority” of surviving witnesses testified to seeing or hearing only two Inland Regional ...

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    While owners of low-cost Fire tablets aren’t routinely characterized as extremely tech-savvy, and Amazon’s argument for ditching full disk encryption probably held up, the timing of the security-shrinking move wasn’t the wisest. Even if no one actually uses the feature, it feels weird to just give it up voluntarily, without so much as a heads up, when other companies’ execs are literally risking their freedom to protect it on every single iDevice around. But ultimately, Amazon appears to have listened to the voice of reason (and public scrutiny), yielding to the numerous security ...

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    Although it’s probably far from settled, the legal battle between Apple and the FBI over a specific iPhone’s encryption but actually way more than that already provoked all the feelings. You may have started off somewhere in the middle, understanding the stances of both involved parties, and you likely groaned at Trump’s boycott pleas, shed a tear as a San Bernardino survivor’s husband announced his unlikely support for Cupertino, and laughed when an iPad Pro froze in front of Congress. While it’s virtually impossible now to maintain a neutral position concerning the privacy war ...

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    After several weeks of heated controversy, heavy accusations of Apple support for terrorism, and counter-accusations of the public’s violation of privacy by the FBI, the most important encryption dispute ever has finally reached the US Congress. Before it can be decided if legislature must be passed to back tech companies or law enforcement organizations in similar cases in the future, the two parties offered their arguments yesterday, with Bruce Sewell obviously taking on central deposition duties for Apple. Sewell has been Cupertino’s general counsel and senior vice president of ...

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    While the tech community watches the drama unfold between Apple and the FBI over the phone used by the San Bernardino shooter, there are other cases working their way through our legal system. Yesterday a federal judge in Brooklyn ruled against the FBI in a situation where law enforcement wanted Apple to unlock the phone of a suspected drug dealer. In his ruling, Judge James Orenstein said "The relief the government seeks is unavailable because Congress has considered legislation that would achieve the same result but has not adopted it", referencing recent legislation that Congress failed ...

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    Various polls conducted on the heels of Apple’s refusal to comply with a court order and assist the FBI in decrypting an iPhone 5c potentially containing information relevant to the San Bernardino shooting investigation have perhaps surprisingly shown most Americans don’t share Tim Cook’s stance on privacy. But even as all remaining Republican presidential candidates and miscellaneous public institutions turn up the heat on Apple to give up security for this “particular” device, the tech giant’s opposition is unflinching. More so after an unexpected favorable New York district ...

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    You don’t need boots on the ground, armed drones or bombs to assist in stopping ISIS from spreading its global reign of terror. The war has long been about ideology as much as public beheadings, and in the digital age, it’s equally important to hinder the dissemination of hateful online propaganda and apprehend leaders of the self-proclaimed “Islamic State.” But when is censorship really an acceptable reaction to anything? Apparently, now, since the Director of the National Counterterrorism Center deems the “more aggressive takedowns across social media platforms” of late “a ...

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    In today’s installment of the never-ending “who supports who” saga concerning Apple’s ongoing opposition to a San Bernardino court order, the tech giant adds another big industry name to its corner, while the FBI manages to unite the entire field of Republican presidential contenders behind it. After Google, Facebook, BlackBerry and Microsoft, Verizon finally weighed in on the matter of device encryption vs terrorist resistance, highlighting its commitment to “protecting customer privacy.” The CEO of the largest American wireless service provider, Lowell McAdam, went on record ...

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    The world is basically split in half when it comes to Apple’s recent clash with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, US courts and other government institutions in regards to breaking the encryption on an iPhone 5c owned by a San Bernardino mass murderer at the time of the December 2015 massacre. There are those radically opposing Cupertino’s stance, arguing the tech giant is siding with terrorists. Meanwhile, many of the industry’s shot callers unconditionally support Tim Cook in his fight for online and mobile privacy. Finally, some voices are positioned in the middle, asking for ...

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