Posts tagged with: security
  • by | March 13, 2014 7:33 PM

    The All New HTC One won't grace us with its presence until the end of the month, and at this point we're beginning to wonder if HTC will have anything left to reveal at the announcement. From a sales guide to promotional materials to yet another undercover hands-on video, the leaks surrounding one of the year's most anticipated Android handsets refuse to let up – and we're here to talk about them in our latest pre-#ANHO podcast! Before that, of course, we've got the usual news of the week, including a duo of Samsung tablet reviews, rampant speculation about a brick-and-mortar Google ...

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  • by | March 6, 2014 7:13 AM

    Smartwatches are great. I was in a meeting with several other people last night. Sporadically a smartphone would sound off, interrupting all of us. Each time two or three would pull their phone out of their pocket or purse, check their notifications, and all but one would put it back away. Since I was wearing a Pebble smartwatch, it was easy to tell when the alert was for me: my wrist would vibrate and the alert was displayed on the watch face. It felt good knowing that I was so much more technologically advanced than all the others. But that got me thinking... Smartwatches are super ...

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  • by | December 17, 2013 7:29 AM

    Desktop and laptop computers are a huge mess of lax security. A program that you install on one of these devices is allowed by its operating systems to have virtually unlimited access to everything.  Our mobile operating systems are a little more refined and most tell you, the end user, what access an application is requesting before you install it. Unfortunately, most of us don't read those pesky permissions prompts and just say "yes" to everything. We are, however, given the chance to say "no". Until somewhat recently that was our only option: either we accepted everything an app asked ...

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  • by | October 14, 2013 7:29 AM

    Do you remember when, if someone said a government agency was "listening in" on phone calls made by its citizens they were labeled a "crackpot", a "whack job", a "nut case", or a "conspiracy theorist"? A government can't possibly do all that, and even if they could, they wouldn't because it's just crazy, right? Fast forward to today and we now know that the government agencies are doing exactly that. Verizon has admitted to an order to provide information on all telephone calls in its system to the NSA on an "ongoing, daily basis". What's more, all major carriers have either admitted to ...

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  • by | August 26, 2013 6:48 AM

    We live in a wonderful time. Most of us carry around a relatively small electronic device with us all the time. With a few button presses we can talk to anyone anywhere in the world -- or we can send short messages if a conversation is just too much work. We can share a picture with thousands of people almost instantaneously. And we literally have all the information of the ages at our finger tips. All this power comes with a cost -- a couple costs, actually. The first is a physical cost. We must buy these electronic doodads with money, then we must pay a monthly subscription to connect ...

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  • by | April 30, 2013 10:36 AM

    Almost every mobile platform today comes pre-packaged with some sort of app store. For Android that's Google's Play Store, Windows Phone and iOS both have their own app stores, too. All of these marketplaces allow you to browse, search, find, and download apps for your mobile device. They each also let you update the apps that you've already installed on your device, whenever an update is published. Facebook recently started updating their app -- from within their app. If that sounds strange to you, it is. The usual manner of updating would be by pushing a new version of the .apk to the ...

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  • by | January 24, 2013 7:58 PM

    Our lives are becoming more tightly integrated with online services every day. From email, calender, and to-do lists, to grades, banking, and bill payment, almost everything can be done via some web portal on some web server. To protect ourselves from identity theft we're told we need to use passwords that are long, contain mixed-case lettering, numbers, and even symbols -- in other words, we need passwords that are difficult for us to remember. Then, to make matters worse, we're told that we need to use different passwords for each site so we minimize the potential impact if any one of ...

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