Posts tagged with: Safari
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    For many of us, web browsing is the heart and soul of our mobile usage. Browsing web pages from a coffee shop on your phone or buying something from Amazon while waiting in line are what make modern smartphones so different from their ancestors. Mobile browsing today is not all that bad, fairly enjoyable, and actually pretty efficient. So how do the two most popular mobile platforms compare when it comes to mobile browsing? Ignoring all the third-party options available on both and not considering meaningless benchmarks or page load times, the out-of-the-box browsing experience on Android ...

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    The "flagship killer" that demands that you "NEVER SETTLE" breaks cover. The pioneer of the modern mobile browser shares his story. And at long last, Microsoft and Nokia finally consummate their love. We could have a feature segment, but with news this hot, do we really need one? Not with a guest like Stefan Constantinescu of TabDump to bring some flavor (and profanity) to the proceedings, that's for sure. A word on the language of this episode: we've recently ditched the "Clean" content rating that's been with us from the start of the Weekly, trading it in for Apple's ominous "Explicit" ...

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    As much as many try to disregard the iPhone as being as important as it was to the mobile industry, how many of you actually remember what it was like to browse a website before the iPhone was launched. Apple touted the iPhone as being an internet communicator when it was announced, and a lot of that success came from the browser it announced in 2007. Today almost every mobile browser uses WebKit, which was the engine that powered mobile Safari, and which Apple was kind enough to open-source to the world, and one of its creators has decided to talk about his experience. Francisco Tolmasky ...

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    Mobile devices used to be primarily portable email boxes with integrated calendar and contacts. In the early days, some of them may have included web browsers, but they were very primitive. Back then the Web was very complex, and designed for screens with resolutions of 800 by 600 and higher. To accommodate phones and PDAs a "new" web was invented, one that used a completely different protocol to address the concerns of much smaller screens, slower processors, and mobile data plans. None of which were anywhere close to what we have today. WAP & WML This "new" web was based on something ...

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