Posts tagged with: replacement
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    Roughly four weeks ago, Samsung dropped the bombshell. But (way too) many Galaxy Note 7 owners either didn’t care about the risks of hanging on to their potentially explosive phablets, or simply missed the news of the voluntary global recall. Once the Consumer Product Safety Commission was brought in to ensure the US exchange process would eventually be done by the book, and software updates started flying around to constantly warn people of the hazardous situation and even limit battery charges, there was no avoiding the inevitable. Still, progress is heavy, including stateside and on ...

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    At least one Galaxy Note 7 in the US, given as a replacement for a recalled device, is in the process of being exchanged for a new unit by Samsung. The Wall Street Journal received a statement from the company saying that multiple reports of overheating new Note 7 units do "not pose a safety concern." The issues have affected US and Korean units. One case caused a device shutdown during an international Skype call while another got so hot that the user "found it uncomfortable to speak into it." "In normal conditions, all smartphones may experience temperature fluctuations," the company ...

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    Recalling every potentially faulty Galaxy Note 7 unit around the world certainly took guts, as Samsung yielded to a “heartbreaking” direct financial loss of at least $1 billion, not to mention indirect hits to the company’s market value, brand recognition and, possibly, even its long-term product roadmap. But apparently, the Korean tech giant remains confident it “can start to make up any ground that we have lost and get that momentum back into our business… as we exit 2016 and set ourselves up for a strong 2017.” It’s unclear if the Galaxy S8 might be slated for an extremely ...

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    It’s no longer a big secret that Samsung made quite a mess of its otherwise honorable voluntary Galaxy Note 7 recall, especially stateside, but ever since the Consumer Product Safety Commission came in, things seem to be slowly straightening out. Roughly 25 percent of defective units sold in the US prior to a sudden burst of fire reports, some legit, others still questionable, have so far been exchanged with safe-to-use S Pen phablets, which may not sound like a lot, but it’s progress. Samsung even deems the percentage “an extraordinarily fast start toward achieving our goal of ...

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    Samsung sure made a lot of errors in judgment both before and after releasing the “game-changing” Galaxy Note 7 with an insufficiently inspected battery, most recently failing to set up a proper device exchanging program for hazardous units purchased straight from the OEM’s US e-store. There was also plenty of confusion surrounding the recall process at other retailers, some being unable or unwilling to provide temporary J-series backups. As for actual safe-to-use Note 7 replacements, these appeared to randomly feature either a black square or blue S logo on their new retail boxes. ...

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    Enough confusion, speculation, mixed public messages, and failed attempts at containing one of the biggest scandals in the smartphone industry’s history without properly involving the authorities. Samsung is ready to take the bull by the horns at last, working with the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission to ensure the “about 1 million” hazardous Galaxy Note 7 devices sold in the country before September 15 are all taken off the streets, replaced, and buried somewhere they can do no more harm. Speaking of, the CPSC has confirmed the overheating battery report count now ...

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    It’s perhaps needless to stress that, wherever or however you might intend to travel, by car, bus, train or plane, continuing to use and especially charging potentially hazardous Galaxy Note 7 units isn’t a good idea. But just as an extra precaution, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has taken to Twitter the other day to urge its customers “not to use or charge their #Samsung Galaxy Note 7 mobile device on trains and buses.” Similar to a number of airlines around the world, the public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the US state of New ...

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    As Samsung continues pressing further recalls for its defective and exploding Galaxy Note 7 devices around the world, it's also finalizing new units that will be shipped to replace each and every one of them. Plans in Australia have new units out by next week while the US is getting an "expedited" treatment. How sped up? Maybe a hint could be found in responses from Samsung Canada as it is working to replace about 22,000 units in the country. Customers were asked — and encouraged by Health Canada — to register for a Note 7 exchange program. Once that was done, users received an email ...

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    While Samsung certainly deserves to get flak for endangering people’s lives by not properly testing the Galaxy Note 7 and its now definitively faulty battery prior to the phablet’s commercial launch, you can’t turn a blind eye to the response time, rapid acknowledgment and stellar overall damage control from the past week. Sweeping this issue under the rug was never an option, and as “heartbreaking” as short-term financial losses might feel, there’s something far more important at stake. The logical next step in the OEM’s rampant reputation-saving campaign after a voluntary ...

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    In case you didn’t quite grasp the risks of refusing to return your shiny new but potentially defective Samsung Galaxy Note 7 for a less fiery replacement or full refund, a series of unfortunate events recently reported stateside and in Australia may serve as a loud wake-up call. This thing is a very serious fire hazard, and although the chances of the phone randomly exploding in your hand remain slim, no one’s 100 percent safe around a Note 7, and no one should be foolish to play Russian roulette with an arguably massive near-empty gun chamber. How would you like to wake up to not ...

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    Confession time. I'm a mobile technology enthusiast and editorialist who doesn't own a "real" tablet. At least, I don't own a “real” tablet by most measurable standards. My flat panel devices at home consist of a Kindle Fire, an HP TouchPad running webOS, and an HP TouchPad running CM9. There is a reason for this. The biggest reason is I don't really have a pile of money lying around to buy a tablet, unless it's a laptop replacement. And this is why. I got my TouchPads during the firesale. Indeed, at the time, I didn't buy the TouchPad on launch day because it was too expensive for ...

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