Posts tagged with: privacy
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    The words you say and the content you send via iMessage is encrypted from end-to-end. But police can still request Apple to see who you sent all those messages to. The Intercept has obtained an internal document that reveals how the company logs phone numbers every time you start a new conversation in what's now officially known as the Messages app. Once you type a number in, iMessages riles through Apple's servers to figure if it should convey messages through SMS or through Apple's proprietary system. All that results in the color of the text bubble you see from your recipient once they ...

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    Update: Spectacles.com is live and details some of the features of the product, including that Android phones will be connected via Wi-Fi while iPhones will be connected through Bluetooth. Clips as long as 30 seconds can be recorded. The Wall Street Journal combined a feature on Snapchat's sharp millennial CEO, Evan Spiegel, and the empire he has built with a new product peg. A hardware peg, to be precise. Despite what many consider a horribly cluttered user interface that belies the private video sharing app, the Journal's Seth Stevenson calls upon Spiegel's "aptitude for product ...

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    The highest-profile battle over privacy and technology has not ended. In fact, it may have only just begun with a lawsuit filed by three news organizations against the FBI. You may recall that the agency wanted Apple to decrypt an iPhone 5c in the possession of Syed Rizwan Farook, one of the perpetrators of a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, that killed 14 people and wounded 24 others. Farook and co-perpetrator, wife Tashfeen Malik, were killed shortly after their attack. The FBI claimed it wanted to obtain sensitive documents from the phone that might have helped Farook plan ...

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    The US, Canada, UK, France, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands are now free to pre-order the DTEK50, BlackBerry's first of two mid-range smartphones for the next year. As rumored, the phone is produced by TCL and is very much similar to the Alcatel Idol 4. We saw a quick hit of specifications earlier today, but we now can bring you some specifics. Here's a full chart: [table] Component,Description Screen size,5.2 inches Resolution,1920 x 1080 Pixel desnity,424 ppi SoC,Qualcomm Snapdragon 617 Type,Octa-core Speed,4 x 1.5GHz / 4 x 1.2GHz GPU,Adreno 405 RAM,3GB Storage,16GB (microSD-expandable ...

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    Edward Snowden, who's been in exile from the US ever since he published reams of secret NSA documents, has come together with hacker Andrew Huang to design a case for the iPhone 6 that would be able to tell if your device's antennas were off when you actually turn them off. The pair, who have been communicating through Snowden's own messenger app, Signal, showed off the design and discussed the warfare that government wages against journalists in exposing history-changing information at the MIT Media Lab. "One good journalist in the right place at the right time can change history," ...

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    BlackBerry CEO John Chen took the time at his company's Security Summit this week to once again rip Apple, "the other fruit company" to shreds for defending its encryption against the FBI regarding an iPhone used by a suspect in a mass shooting. "I found that disturbing as a citizen. I think BlackBerry, like any company, should have a basic civil responsibility," Chen said. "If the world is in danger, we should be able to help out." Apple refused to assist the Department of Justice in unlocking Syed Farook's iPhone 5c. He and his wife were the alleged perpetrators of an attack on a San ...

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    Pokémon GO players on iOS have been worried about what they've had to give up too much information about themselves through their Google accounts. Some have noticed that the permission prompt seen at login has been asking for full access to one's Google account. But the game's maker, Niantic Labs, has put out a statement to the contrary. It reads in part: [...] Pokémon GO only accesses basic Google profile information (specifically, your User ID and email address) and no other Google account information is or has been accessed or collected. Once we became aware of this error, we began ...

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    Android is a great open source operating platform for mobile, but let's face it: it's not the most secure thing out there. Then again, you want secure? You want BlackPhone's PrivatOS, based off of Android? Be prepared for lockdown. Tinkerer's hell. One or the other. Pick one poison over the other. It's how it has been for a while. But Canada-based Copperhead Security has been trying to seal the deal between security and openness with its own Android-based operating system called — what else? — CopperheadOS. And it's selling modified Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P phones with CopperheadOS on ...

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    The same lawmaker that had the state of Utah recognize that pornography is a public health crisis is back at it. This time, Senator Todd Weiler is working on three bills that would force Utahns to opt-in to access X-rated materials online. Some of them would require filters be installed onto smartphones and tablets. // 0&&(d-=1)}),s.on("internal-error",function(t){i("ierr",[t,(new Date).getTime(),!0])})},{}],3:[function(t,e,n){t("loader").features.ins=!0},{}],4:[function(t,e,n){function r(t){}if(window.performance&&window.performance.timing&&window.performance.getEntriesByType){var ...

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    All of us are born with certain "natural rights" - rights which are are not dependent on the laws, customs, or beliefs of any particular culture or government, and are therefore universal and inalienable. Among those are the right to privacy, of which I'm an advocate. Since the world's governments aren't doing a very good job respecting privacy (let alone protecting it like they should be), the responsibility falls to us, individually. Thankfully, technology gives us the tools we need to build solutions that will help deter all but the most determined parties from invading our ...

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    The iPhone belonging to a confessed drug dealer in Brooklyn has been cracked into. But it wasn't opened with the zero-day exploit that the FBI purchased supposedly from a gray hat hacker. Someone else just knew the passcode for the iPhone. Prosecutors in the case said that an unidentified person turned in the code. The Justice Department had been requesting for Apple's assistance in opening up the iPhone, running iOS 7, for months. This case pre-dates the San Bernadino debacle that brought the nation face-first into a public debate about privacy, security and encryption. The drug dealer ...

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    If you're in Canada and you don't want the Royal Canadian Mounted Police peeping through your BlackBerry's content, get rid of it. Chances are, if that phone's not for business, the agency has a way to get into it — likely thanks to BlackBerry. An investigation lead by Motherboard and Vice tells of "over one million" BBM messages obtained and then read by breaking BlackBerry's standard end-to-end encryption. The messages were used to pin down suspects of a mafia-related murder in Montreal. The company uses a "global encryption key" on all of its devices while corporate phones pass ...

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    Last week, an item came across our news desk which started the little hamster in my brain a-runnin’. Congresswoman Jackie Speier wants to close the “burner phone loophole” and require cheap, prepaid phones to be registered at the point of sale, which is sure to upset Hollywood scriptwriters throughout the entire city. Essentially, these low-cost, pre-paid cell phones would no longer be anonymous devices to be thrown casually into the trash after mocking local law enforcement. Rather they’d be a CSI: Cyber dream come true as they would all have a name, and presumably Social ...

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    Oh, how it must sting that Apple needs law enforcement cooperation now, after so many adamant refusals of its own assistance in a very delicate and complex terrorist attack investigation! But hands down the most ironic thing about this point of Cupertino’s FBI dispute is the intelligence service can’t be compelled to disclose the hacking technique used on Syed Farook’s iPhone 5c. Tim Cook could always sue, which would be even more ironic, and argue a so-called “Vulnerabilities Equities Process” applies here. Unfortunately, that’s not exactly an official or legal act, but rather ...

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    All’s well that ends well. But has the colossal Apple – FBI squabble on delicate matters like device encryption, data protection and counter-terrorism efforts really ended well for both parties involved? At least one? Not exactly, and ultimately, this long, contested battle will probably go down in the history books as a tie. On one hand, the Cupertino-based tech giant stood its ground against the US Department of Justice, and evaded any definitive laws passed in Congress forcing it to comply with court orders in cases of private information extraction from iDevices. On the other, law ...

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    More users than ever are concerned with their mobile privacy these days, taking steps to secure their data like encrypting phone storage, running VPNs, and being mindful about what kind of personal data they voluntarily share with the companies behind apps and services. All that may be well and good, but at the end of the day you're still carrying around what's essentially a mobile tracking device registered in your name – pretty much the worst nightmare of any privacy-minded folk. The desire to separate your phone service from your identity has led to the proliferation of so-called ...

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    If you perhaps wondered why US law enforcement insists so many iPhones seized in serious crime investigations be unlocked by Apple, with little to no mention of similar requests for Android handhelds, it turns out it’s not because iGear is more popular among criminals. Granted, government-funded institutions like the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health tend to distribute iPhones as work equipment to their employees, which indirectly led to the huge controversy regarding the Syed Farooq-owned 5c. Yes, the FBI’s access to data stored on the infamous device could have been ...

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    As a presidential candidate that prides himself on “telling it like it is”, as well as his ‘uge dingus, Donald Trump has sure been caught lying a lot lately. Trump University is under scrutiny, and so was the Republican front-runner’s knowledge of David Duke and the former KKK Grand Wizard’s anti-Semitic views in recent weeks. On a much lighter note, Tim Cook should probably be relieved to hear the controversial but surging politician couldn’t stay away from his iPhone for more than a few weeks. Remember the Apple boycott he randomly pleaded for during a rally back in February ...

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    The FBI, San Bernardino County District Attorney, the local Police Department and all their highly-placed politician supporters have never been able to provide a very compelling argument for why a specific iPhone 5c owned by a terrorist needs to be decrypted. Until Friday, that is, when San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan made a fairly solid case for the unlocking of the device for the sake of clarity. Clarity regarding the number of December 2, 2015 assailants. According to Burguan, “the majority” of surviving witnesses testified to seeing or hearing only two Inland Regional ...

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    While owners of low-cost Fire tablets aren’t routinely characterized as extremely tech-savvy, and Amazon’s argument for ditching full disk encryption probably held up, the timing of the security-shrinking move wasn’t the wisest. Even if no one actually uses the feature, it feels weird to just give it up voluntarily, without so much as a heads up, when other companies’ execs are literally risking their freedom to protect it on every single iDevice around. But ultimately, Amazon appears to have listened to the voice of reason (and public scrutiny), yielding to the numerous security ...

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    Although it’s probably far from settled, the legal battle between Apple and the FBI over a specific iPhone’s encryption but actually way more than that already provoked all the feelings. You may have started off somewhere in the middle, understanding the stances of both involved parties, and you likely groaned at Trump’s boycott pleas, shed a tear as a San Bernardino survivor’s husband announced his unlikely support for Cupertino, and laughed when an iPad Pro froze in front of Congress. While it’s virtually impossible now to maintain a neutral position concerning the privacy war ...

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    After several weeks of heated controversy, heavy accusations of Apple support for terrorism, and counter-accusations of the public’s violation of privacy by the FBI, the most important encryption dispute ever has finally reached the US Congress. Before it can be decided if legislature must be passed to back tech companies or law enforcement organizations in similar cases in the future, the two parties offered their arguments yesterday, with Bruce Sewell obviously taking on central deposition duties for Apple. Sewell has been Cupertino’s general counsel and senior vice president of ...

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    Various polls conducted on the heels of Apple’s refusal to comply with a court order and assist the FBI in decrypting an iPhone 5c potentially containing information relevant to the San Bernardino shooting investigation have perhaps surprisingly shown most Americans don’t share Tim Cook’s stance on privacy. But even as all remaining Republican presidential candidates and miscellaneous public institutions turn up the heat on Apple to give up security for this “particular” device, the tech giant’s opposition is unflinching. More so after an unexpected favorable New York district ...

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    When Apple was ordered to help assist the US government in decoding an iPhone 5c that belonged to the San Bernardino mass shooter, CEO Tim Cook was quick to type up and publish a response against the thrust of that court ruling. But it didn't file a formal response to the order. The federal magistrate judge overseeing the case said Apple had five business days to respond. According to two anonymous sources, instead of next Tuesday, February 23, the company is reportedly getting until Friday the 26th to compose its arguments. Three days may not seem like much time, but it's all the extra ...

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    California and New York are working on bills that would prohibit (or severely restrict) encryption on phones. Why is encryption so important, and why are encryption laws that prohibit your ability to secure your devices and data such a bad idea? Back before these United States of America were recognized as a country, we were colonies of Great Britain. Pilgrims to the Americas were typically fleeing governmental or religious oppression, seeking a new start is a far-off land, free from the shackles and scrutiny of over-reaching governments and tyrants. That was a long time ago, and what ...

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