Posts tagged with: overclock
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    The Galaxy Note II was once one of the fastest and most powerful smartphones on the market. But with newer Snapdragon chipsets and faster clock speeds, the Note II is begging to show its age, if only a tiny bit. The 1.6GHz quad-core Exynos 4412 chip is definitely no slouch, but it isn't quite as snappy or powerful as more modern chips. To speed things up, nothing ever works quite as well as wiping the phone and starting from scratch. As you load more games and fill up the internal storage, the phone will naturally begin to slow down. But if you don't want to take the time to set everything ...

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    The Nexus 4 is the go-to device for many developers. Offering the purest Google experience and literally built for developers, it's the most vanilla Android experience possible. It's lightweight and comes with no bloatware. There's practically nothing to over-encumber  the device straight out of the box. That said, the handset is beginning to age as faster, more efficient chipsets arrive. It just doesn't feel as fast as it once did. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to spruce up your ol' Nexus by way of various custom mods. Try a new ROM, or theme it to no end. Or, take a custom ...

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    The HTC One may be one of the fastest clocked smartphones on the market. It's powered by a 1.7Ghz quad-core Snapdragon 600 chipset that puts last year's chips to shame. But for some, fast simply isn't enough. Some need more power, more speed, more gigahertz. Some need an overclocked HTC One. Fortunately, that's not out of the question, and enabling it is quite simple. All you need is the right kernel, a little know-how and a custom recovery. Flash away and reap the benefits of a processor clock speed faster than the factory settings will allow. Beware, though. Turn up the dial too much ...

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    Whenever we think about computing speed we usually limit ourselves to Gigahertz -- how fast the processor is that's crunching all the data inside our devices. The number of cores and the architecture of the chip obviously have some bearing, but we can't change those without buying a new device that includes the latest and greatest chip inside it. When we want to speed up our current smartphones and tablets, our minds turn to overclocking: running the chip faster than the device manufacturer intended it to run. You can also "over-volt" your processor, which supplies it with more power ...

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