Posts tagged with: messenger
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    Pry yourself away from all the Android 5.0 update stuff for a moment, and you'll notice quite a bit of additional software news happening today with Google and Android. Some of that involves updates to existing apps – nothing out of the ordinary for one of Google's “update Wednesdays” - but this week the company also sees fit to break ground on a new (or reincarnated old) one, quietly releasing the stand-alone Messenger app. Messenger almost feels like a step backwards from Google's recent push to bring ALL your instant messaging – whether that's straight-up IMs or old text ...

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    Last week the Internet exploded with people complaining about the security permissions required by the latest update to the Facebook Messenger app for Android. Now that some of the initial knee-jerk reaction has passed, is there anything you need to be worried about? And if so, how worried should you be? Let's dig into some background before we dive into that. Facebook is huge. It's been just more than a decade since being founded, employs more than 7,000 people, and has over 1.28 billion active users. Add to the fact that we recently learned that Facebook has been "experimenting with the ...

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    Back in February, Facebook announced it was buying popular mobile messaging app, WhatsApp, for a whopping $19 billion. We later compared WhatsApp to Facebook's in-house chat service, Facebook Messenger. We learned that, despite their core differences, they had a lot in common. But how does WhatsApp compare to, say, another popular mobile messaging service like Kik? WhatsApp is powered by your mobile number – it requires a working number for activation. Kik, on the other hand, doesn't require a working number and it doesn't require other people to have your number to work. One of its best ...

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    We live in a world of vast technological choices and options. That's a good thing. Without options we'd be left with just one solution to choose from. Quality, features, and functionality would be limited, and the choices we'd have would likely be of poor quality. At least that's the way a monopoly usually works. Instead we have three (or four) primary choices for our mobile operating systems (with more on the way). We can get hardware from any one of a dozen OEMs. We can install software on our devices to enable us to do things that would have seemed to be "science fiction" a decade ago. ...

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