Posts tagged with: Law
  • by |

    We've been using the iOS 10 and Apple Watch OS 3 developer preview BETAs for almost a week. How is Apple stacking up to it Android competition? Bluetooth 5 is coming with more bandwidth and a focus on "Internet of Things". And, Net neutrality is defended again, this time in the courts. Will companies start accepting it now as the law of the land? These stories and we'll be tackling your questions and comments. Make sure you're charged and ready for episode 205 of the Pocketnow Weekly! Watch the video broadcast from 2:00pm Eastern on June 17th (click here for your local time), or check out ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    What's said to be billions of dollars will not go to Oracle because of today's federal jury ruling. All ten members of the panel agreed that Google's appropriation of 37 Java APIs in its development of Android fell under the "fair use" clause of copyright law. Shortly after the verdict, Google stated that: Today's verdict that Android makes fair use of Java APIs represents a win for the Android ecosystem, for the Java programming community, and for software developers who rely on open and free programming languages to build innovative consumer products. Oracle looks to appeal. Oracle's ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    The same lawmaker that had the state of Utah recognize that pornography is a public health crisis is back at it. This time, Senator Todd Weiler is working on three bills that would force Utahns to opt-in to access X-rated materials online. Some of them would require filters be installed onto smartphones and tablets. // 0&&(d-=1)}),s.on("internal-error",function(t){i("ierr",[t,(new Date).getTime(),!0])})},{}],3:[function(t,e,n){t("loader").features.ins=!0},{}],4:[function(t,e,n){function r(t){}if(window.performance&&window.performance.timing&&window.performance.getEntriesByType){var ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    "After an earlier run at settling this case failed, the court observed that some cases just need to be tried. This case apparently needs to be tried twice." That's what a US District Court judge in San Francisco said after settlement talks broke down between Oracle, the company that owns the Java API, and Google, which used JavaScript in building its Android operating system. The first trial, dating back to 2012, ended in a mistrial as a hung jury couldn't decide whether Google's fair use argument was valid. Oracle is looking for billions in royalties it thinks it was deprived of. Chief ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    An Arkansas prosecutor's office was the first local law enforcement agency to request the FBI's help to decrypt a case-critical iPhone. It's expected to be the first of many — we know of quite a few requests for Apple to decrypt iPhones that may be retracted and sent instead to the FBI. "As has been our longstanding policy, the FBI will of course consider any tool that might be helpful to our partners," the FBI said in a letter to local authorities. "Please know that we will continue to do everything we can to help you consistent with our legal and policy constraints." That help may ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Apple wants Samsung's money back. It is petitioning the federal appeals court that reversed a jury verdict that awarded $120 million in damages to Apple. One of its attorneys said that the appellate judge panel researched its own material, leaving it out of the trial court record and thus, deprived the company the right to an appeals trial by jury as would be provided in the Seventh Amendment. Apple wants a rehearing en banc, that is, with most of the judges in the federal circuit. An appeals court does not try a case: it only considers facts and arguments laid out in the preceding trial, ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    If the FBI is able to enforce a court order that would force Apple to assist in the decryption of an iPhone 5c that was in the hands of a mass shooter, the company's engineers would have several options to resist against having to work on the order. In fact, they could potentially leave Apple off the hook in complying with the agency. The New York Times has interviewed several current and former Apple employees involved in the development and engineering of products and security as well as former executives. These employees stand with not only CEO Tim Cook's insistence that the ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    While the tech community watches the drama unfold between Apple and the FBI over the phone used by the San Bernardino shooter, there are other cases working their way through our legal system. Yesterday a federal judge in Brooklyn ruled against the FBI in a situation where law enforcement wanted Apple to unlock the phone of a suspected drug dealer. In his ruling, Judge James Orenstein said "The relief the government seeks is unavailable because Congress has considered legislation that would achieve the same result but has not adopted it", referencing recent legislation that Congress failed ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Two ingenious, evil suspects are on the run from authorities after having successfully made $5,200 in illicit Apple Watch returns. And that may be just a part of their racket. One thief made a return of a shrink-wrapped Apple Watch box at a San Diego-area Target store. He got $300 for the transaction and the product was restocked. When the box was opened days later, it was found to contain a water bottle and paper towels. Law enforcement believe they have been able to tie the duo to false Apple Watch returns in 10 cities between Nevada and California since January 28 with a total gain of ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    You might be able to now pay for your groceries using a selfie. But for some so-called "Selfie Experts" looking for a quick self-portrait to share on social media, they've had to pay with their lives. For the past two years, India was home to 19 of the 49 deaths caused by the pursuit of the great selfie. Many have gone to the edge of a hill or cliff before smashing their heads or fell to a drowning. Three university students taking a group photo on a railway tracks met their fates with a speeding train. Mumbai police have decided to face this issue by deciding to go zero-tolerance — ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    As the papers, folders, experts, laypeople, presidential candidates and lawyers line up to play their role in what could be the start of a legal saga that will determine how government treads upon encryption, it seems that the party who may hold the most emotional sway in this case have chosen a side. Stephen Larson, a federal judge turned private lawyer, is now representing some of the victims of the San Bernardino shootings and has said to Reuters that they will file legal briefs on the side of the government. The government has ordered Apple to create a version of its iOS mobile ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Apple believes it is fighting a fight that should not have had to surface in the first place. As Cupertino is in the midst of digging up facts and arguments to counter a law enforcement order and the US government's subsequent force de frappe in enforcing it, it has found a key fact that could subvert the basis of that order. The company was already assisting the FBI's investigation into San Bernardino mass shooter Syed Farook's iPhone 5c. Farook, who, along with his wife, killed 14 people at the Inland Regional Center, died in a subsequent shootout with police. BuzzFeed News reports ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    When Apple was ordered to help assist the US government in decoding an iPhone 5c that belonged to the San Bernardino mass shooter, CEO Tim Cook was quick to type up and publish a response against the thrust of that court ruling. But it didn't file a formal response to the order. The federal magistrate judge overseeing the case said Apple had five business days to respond. According to two anonymous sources, instead of next Tuesday, February 23, the company is reportedly getting until Friday the 26th to compose its arguments. Three days may not seem like much time, but it's all the extra ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Update: Well, that was a whirlwind. And next week's gonna be crazy as well. Join us then! The Pocketnow team is prepping for harvest season at MWC 2016 in Barcelona. We're expecting some huge announcements from some major players, and we've been catching some interesting leaks from around the web. Samsung is teasing "life proof" build quality on the Galaxy S7. We might finally know what LG's "Magic" accessory port is all about, and what's going on with selling unreleased phones through Dubai's version of Craigslist? Another week of mobile tech news has passed, and we're going to talk about ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    The tech hivemind works in mysterious ways. On providing free internet, it's confused. On invalid patents, it's against Apple. But most everyone agrees that impenetrable encryption, where offered, should be kept impenetrable. Apple CEO Tim Cook has stood the company's ground on this matter, pitting it against the FBI and the court in investigating the shooting in San Bernardino. Google CEO Sundar Pichai has just voiced his support with Tim Cook in a series of tweets. 1/5 Important post by @tim_cook. Forcing companies to enable hacking could compromise users’ privacy — sundarpichai ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Apple has previously stated that the company would never open a encryption backdoor for nor allow server access to government agencies. The company claims it does not have the ability to decrypt its own devices running iOS 8 or later — only those who have the password to the encrypted device have access to what's inside it. The US Attorney's Office has decided that Apple's assistance in unlocking an iPhone 5c is warranted anyway and a court judge has agreed. That iPhone 5c belonged to the San Bernardino County Department of Health and was assigned to Syed Farook, who, together with his ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    As long as the United States's federal government is keeping the internet duty-free, it might as well try and see how it actually feels about this whole encryption thing. Lawmakers in the United Kingdom have been mulling over a bill that would open up backdoors to encryption provided by tech companies from Apple to Facebook to Google. Stateside, the FBI and other law enforcement agencies have been drumming up the case for accessible decryption tools. The governments of New York and California also have bills tilting against impenetrable encryption. Now, Democratic Representative Ted Lieu ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    One thing we haven't had to worry about in the US was paying taxes to get onto the big 'ol Internet. And we may never have to worry about it. The Senate has passed a trade enforcement bill in a 75-20 vote, one that contained the Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act. It made permanent a recurring moratorium on state-levied taxes affecting Internet bandwidth, content and other factors. The last one was signed in 1998 and was to expire this October. Lawmakers and advocate groups from across the political spectrum lauded the act. The House of Representatives voted on the legislation last June. ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    If AT&T, T-Mobile and Comcast pulled zero-rate schemes in India like they did in the US, they would have to stop today. Similarly, Facebook is actually going to have to stop in its tracks from promoting its Free Basics program in the country. The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India has banned "discriminatory tariffs for data services on the basis of content." That means an internet service provider won't be able to charge end users differently for video data than it does for basic data. Access to emergency services or to information during public emergencies are eligible for a ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Uh, well this is interesting. The self-proclaimed Islamic State, also known as Daesh, has taken advantage of the same mobile security measures that many of us lay people have to communicate under the law enforcement radar. Governments have been looking to force messaging services to provide decryption tools for investigators to use in accessing potentially useful exchanges. In the meantime, while Daesh operatives have had tough goes with finding a stable, accessible encrypted conversation medium impenetrable by investigators. With WhatsApp being pried open and an ally-made app called ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Apple's thrown injunction after injunction at Samsung during the course of its drawn-out patent war. Some sales bans happened. Some didn't. This is the story of Schrodinger's sales ban. Samsung asked for a rehearing on an injunction based on three patents including one regarding "quick links," but was denied by the Federal Circuit court of appeals. Apple's original injunction was to allow Samsung to "sunset" the features for 30 days before a sales ban on relevant products took hold. The company hastily requested that the sales ban take hold upon ruling. Northern California US District ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    BlackBerry security and law enforcement investigations do not mix. In general, police have had trouble decrypting phones for investigations. Google, Apple and BlackBerry have been stalwarts in making available the option for its device users to encrypt their data and not have it get deciphered by even those companies. While laws may soon come to pass regarding the issue, the Netherlands Forensic Institute seems to have skipped a step in the snafu — and it comes to a potential punch to BlackBerry's reputation. The NFI, which assists police and other investigators with evidence retrieval, ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Law enforcement and tech companies are at odds on the subject of encryption. It's encryption so thorough that even the tech companies can't decrypt it. Encrypted phones from suspects and victims have stopped homicide investigations. But for those who refuse to incriminate themselves, the issue comes down to basic property and knowledge rights. It seems that the United Kingdom has taken to statute to force Silicon Valley-types into its hand on the topic of encrypted communications. The Investigatory Powers Bill gives law enforcement — from spy agency MI5 to the local police department ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Internet connectivity while travelling across the country is kinda tough. If you don't have unlimited data and a good Wi-Fi hotspot data stash, you're left clinging to airports, restaurants, city parks and hotels. Sometimes, at nasty costs. If that weren't enough, Hilton Hotels made it harder for those who had their own Wi-Fi hotspots to use them at their lodging resorts — just to corral them over to its paid internet services. Turns out, the Federal Communications Commission hates that kind of thing. And with an investigation dragging out way too long since we first reported on it last ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Back in 2009, Apple decided to block over a thousand apps from its App Store in one fell swoop. Most of them had previously been tracked by users and journalists as having been astroturfed — review pages painted with extremely positive, poorly written comments from accounts that only seemed to review a certain developer's products. Mind you, we've covered Samsung's positive and negative astroturfing campaigns before. But the most important things an app has is its star rating and reviews. After all, they're put right up in your face before you hit "install." Some of Bell's employees ...

    Share
    Read On
Mobile Version