Posts tagged with: Law
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    If AT&T, T-Mobile and Comcast pulled zero-rate schemes in India like they did in the US, they would have to stop today. Similarly, Facebook is actually going to have to stop in its tracks from promoting its Free Basics program in the country. The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India has banned "discriminatory tariffs for data services on the basis of content." That means an internet service provider won't be able to charge end users differently for video data than it does for basic data. Access to emergency services or to information during public emergencies are eligible for a ...

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    Uh, well this is interesting. The self-proclaimed Islamic State, also known as Daesh, has taken advantage of the same mobile security measures that many of us lay people have to communicate under the law enforcement radar. Governments have been looking to force messaging services to provide decryption tools for investigators to use in accessing potentially useful exchanges. In the meantime, while Daesh operatives have had tough goes with finding a stable, accessible encrypted conversation medium impenetrable by investigators. With WhatsApp being pried open and an ally-made app called ...

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    Apple's thrown injunction after injunction at Samsung during the course of its drawn-out patent war. Some sales bans happened. Some didn't. This is the story of Schrodinger's sales ban. Samsung asked for a rehearing on an injunction based on three patents including one regarding "quick links," but was denied by the Federal Circuit court of appeals. Apple's original injunction was to allow Samsung to "sunset" the features for 30 days before a sales ban on relevant products took hold. The company hastily requested that the sales ban take hold upon ruling. Northern California US District ...

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    BlackBerry security and law enforcement investigations do not mix. In general, police have had trouble decrypting phones for investigations. Google, Apple and BlackBerry have been stalwarts in making available the option for its device users to encrypt their data and not have it get deciphered by even those companies. While laws may soon come to pass regarding the issue, the Netherlands Forensic Institute seems to have skipped a step in the snafu — and it comes to a potential punch to BlackBerry's reputation. The NFI, which assists police and other investigators with evidence retrieval, ...

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    Law enforcement and tech companies are at odds on the subject of encryption. It's encryption so thorough that even the tech companies can't decrypt it. Encrypted phones from suspects and victims have stopped homicide investigations. But for those who refuse to incriminate themselves, the issue comes down to basic property and knowledge rights. It seems that the United Kingdom has taken to statute to force Silicon Valley-types into its hand on the topic of encrypted communications. The Investigatory Powers Bill gives law enforcement — from spy agency MI5 to the local police department ...

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    Internet connectivity while travelling across the country is kinda tough. If you don't have unlimited data and a good Wi-Fi hotspot data stash, you're left clinging to airports, restaurants, city parks and hotels. Sometimes, at nasty costs. If that weren't enough, Hilton Hotels made it harder for those who had their own Wi-Fi hotspots to use them at their lodging resorts — just to corral them over to its paid internet services. Turns out, the Federal Communications Commission hates that kind of thing. And with an investigation dragging out way too long since we first reported on it last ...

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    Back in 2009, Apple decided to block over a thousand apps from its App Store in one fell swoop. Most of them had previously been tracked by users and journalists as having been astroturfed — review pages painted with extremely positive, poorly written comments from accounts that only seemed to review a certain developer's products. Mind you, we've covered Samsung's positive and negative astroturfing campaigns before. But the most important things an app has is its star rating and reviews. After all, they're put right up in your face before you hit "install." Some of Bell's employees ...

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    We've spent hours on the subject of data transmission security and device security on this site. We've reviewed BlackBerry after BlackBerry and a Blackphone, too — with another one out there that we'd might want in our review labs. A lot of us treasure hiding data from our adversaries and our nightmares, whoever or whatever they are. But in the case of smartphone encryption, you could end up causing a nightmare for if not yourself, then your family and the people that would fight for you. Let's be clear that the majority of smartphones encrypted and picked up by law enforcement come from ...

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    Privacy and security are two major ingredients in the cutthroat world of enterprise technology. BlackBerry's been all about it, so has BlackPhone. Fingerprint scanners are here as a natural evolution of the curiosity in the field of mobile data protection. But whatever you do, if you end up in court for whatever reason and your phone is submitted for evidence, you don't have to surrender one of the most basic security measures ever: your passcode. US District Judge Mark Kearney of Pennsylvania issued an opinion within the SEC-filed case against former Capital One employees who traded based ...

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    But spoiler alert: it's not looking good for Samsung. It may not be nearly the $1.05 billion penalty the Korean OEM was looking at when the final gavel first came down in this case, but still having $548 million on the line isn't a good option for the chaebol, either. One of the late developments we got in Apple's patent suit was that a few of the patents Cupertino contended that Samsung infringed shouldn't have been granted to them in the first place. Yesterday, Samsung made legal moves to ask that one of Apple's patents focusing on a pinch-to-zoom API be made invalid as a matter of law ...

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    Phone unlocking, to be clear, is legal in the United States if the phone in question is out of a service contract. Even though some companies have a hard time of coping with this reality, it's codefied law of the land here. But what AT&T accuses three former employees, one owner of an unlocked phone resale company and 50 unnamed people of doing definitely raises some eyebrows. In the case filed in Seattle US District Court, the ex-AT&T staff allegedly installed malware onto a Seattle-area's AT&T store's computers that was able to compromise the carrier's proprietary customer ...

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    Remember when Apple was asking for a sales ban on Samsung smartphones because they used patented iPhone features? Remember how Apple didn't get it? We don't blame you if you don't, given that we might have to rehash everything as Samsung pursues Cupertino in the Supreme Court. But just so you know, there's an update to the appeal Apple filed for the stoppage. The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has essentially vacated the lower court's rejection of the sales ban and has sent the case back to that lower court for a reconsideration. The original rejection of the sales ban came ...

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    Remember when Microsoft had to pay up for baking in its Microsoft Explorer web browser to Windows while failing to provide alternatives for users? Microsoft sure remembers having to spend more than €500 million to satisfy a fine issued by the European Commission. Indeed, Google has made some decisions with its Play Store policies that may or may not have blurred the line between promoting its own interest and discouraging competition. But the search giant now finds itself under penalty from Russia's Federal Antimonopoly Service for a similar offense. Domestically-based search ...

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    Apple filed suit against Samsung back in 2011, claiming that 25 products from the Korean OEM infringed patents it owned. Counterclaims were filed. Suits were thrown all across the map from Korea to Japan to Australia. Battles were won and lost on both sides. Both sides appeared to have some crack lawyers. It wasn't before August 2012 that the root case in all of this mess, dubbed "Apple I," was sorted out with a $930 million award to the Cupertino tech company. Samsung appealed a part of the ruling this year that related to $400 million of the total damages. Today, the Federal Circuit ...

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    There are plenty of healthy ways of combining mobile technology with our sexual habits: be it through a sexual fitness tracking device, an app that codifies a sexual consent contract, — handy for California users who want to recognize the state's laws on affirmative consent — or even mobile consumption of porn (smartphones have become the most used medium to view those videos). Nearly nine out of ten US adults have sexted at least once, according to a Drexel University survey. And there's a certain ring flash from Lenovo worth chuckling about, but hey, we're not judging. All these ...

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    The mobile world is no stranger to litigation, and 2012 has been a year pockmarked with legal battles of all shapes and sizes. While most of the action has centered around Apple and Samsung, today papers are being served on Microsoft, which just a few days ago unveiled its new Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 platforms. The complainant, SurfCast, is a self-proclaimed operating-system designer headquartered in Portland, Maine. The complaint centers around Windows' use of Live Tiles in the Metro Windows 8 Store Style layout, which SurfCast claims it developed. The company's website says the ...

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    The HTC One X for AT&T and the upcoming HTC EVO 4G LTE for Sprint -- which should hit the shelves this Friday, May 18 -- appear to be delayed by U.S. Customs, according to an official statement released by the Taiwanese manufacturer. The reason behind the delay, according to the wording, is "standard U.S. Customs review of shipments that is required after an ITC exclusion order". "The US availability of the HTC One X and HTC EVO 4G LTE has been delayed due to a standard U.S. Customs review of shipments that is required after an ITC exclusion order. We believe we are in compliance with ...

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