Posts tagged with: lag
  • by | December 19, 2013 3:22 PM

    Last week Stephen Schenck brought us news about some changes coming to the Google Chrome Beta channel, specifically the elimination of an artificial 300 ms lag. Why would anyone deliberately add almost 1/3 second delay to interactions with web pages? Believe it or not, there's a legitimate reason behind it -- but it's one that Google intends to remove -- when applicable. One of the major challenges Apple, Google, Microsoft, and others faced when creating their mobile operating systems was the development of a web browser to include on their devices. It doesn't sound all that difficult, but ...

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  • by | November 14, 2013 2:35 PM

    I talk with a lot of people about mobile technology (a LOT of people), and I read a lot of comments. A common thread that comes up when people learn that I'm Joe the Android Guy™ is the sentiment that "Android is laggy". So let's set the story straight: Android isn't laggy -- but your cheap phone or tablet may be. The problem isn't with the operating system. Android itself is plenty snappy, but Android does things a bit differently than other mobile operating systems. Android runs tasks all the time, no much unlike most modern desktop computers. The more tasks you're running, the slower ...

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  • by | June 14, 2013 1:41 PM

    We recently had the opportunity to review the Sony Xperia Tablet Z, an experience we enjoyed primarily because of the device's innovative hardware: a 6.9mm-thick, 495g chassis that manages to squeeze water- and dust-resistance onto its list of features. Pocketnow is currently in the midst of reviewing the BlackBerry Q10, a peculiar blend of yesterday's design cues with a modern OS - and we're enjoying the feeling of real physical keys under our thumbs again. The third-generation Apple iPad and Microsoft's Surface RT also share space in our office, and we love the sturdy (if heavy) hardware ...

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  • by | January 5, 2013 4:33 PM

    There are two problems with "random" in the computing world. First, "random" isn't truly random, it's only pseudo-random, and the process of making pseudo-random numbers more random is a relatively time consuming process. To help keep your smartphone or tablet whizzing along, the operating system has a pool of "randomness" that be used to help processes that need a random number. As this pool is used the random bits are depleted and need to be restocked with a new set of randomness. Sometimes the random pool gets used up, resulting in processes being "blocked" while the randomness is ...

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