Posts tagged with: jellybean
  • by | June 27, 2012 1:27 PM

    As Google I/O moves forward, Android 4.1 Jellybean owns the spotlight, and there are a ton of great features being demoed as I type. One of the features that wowed us the most is their new Google Voice Search. It not only responds to your voice commands, but the voice and user interface is far more natural than what we've seen on S Voice or even Siri. During the demo, the service was very accurate, and did a great job in handling variable dictation as the person running the demo was throwing questions at it. Sadly, it only received a couple of minutes of spotlight, so there's still more to ...

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  • by | June 27, 2012 1:13 PM

    By using a combination of current location, calendar status, and search history, a new feature of Android Jelly Bean, called Google Now, aims to provide you with information before you need it. For example, it'll know you're in a restaurant and suggest a great dish to try. Or, it'll know that you have an upcoming flight and will keep you updated with flight status, and even tell you what time you need to leave your current location to make the flight on time plus show you the traffic info . You can access Google Now with a swipe up from the bottom of the screen, which is a great universal ...

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  • by | June 25, 2012 9:11 PM

    Wikipedia says a "point release" is a minor release of a software project, especially one intended to fix bugs or do minor cleanups (rather than add features) and implies that such releases are relatively frequent in nature. These versions differ from a "major release", which is typically a full number, and generally represents a significant change in features and is usually accompanied by noticeable modifications to the UI. Google doesn't follow this pattern exactly, instead their bug releases are generally versioned with a "sub-point", and their major versions can be somewhere in ...

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  • by | May 21, 2012 7:16 PM

    Android often takes quite a bit of criticism for its "fragmentation". It's got lots of versions currently on the market, it comes in different shapes and sizes, OEMs can customize it to their liking... the sky is the limit with Android. But have you ever looked beyond the chatter and stopped to ask: Why does Google allow Android to be so open? Why the need for ICS, Jelly Bean, and OEM UIs? That's what we'll talk about in today's episode of the Android Guy Weekly!

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