Posts tagged with: iPhone 5C
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    Can't wait for the next iPhones to come out? Thinking of getting an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus but it's just too darn expensive? Don't want to settle for a refurb or pre-owned unit? T-Mobile has your number, but only if you've got another iPhone you can trade in. You can get a 16GB iPhone 6s for only $100 if you trade in an iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus or an iPhone 6s Plus for some reason. The price jumps to $350 if you give up an iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s or iPhone SE. For a 16GB iPhone 6s Plus, it's $100 for an iPhone 6 Plus swap, $200 for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s and $450 for all iPhone 5 ...

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    It's been one doozy of a day with WWDC's keynote wrapping up in some of the most comprehensive updates to the ecosystem in a while. iOS 10 has brought some big changes to its core features. But you won't be able to see any of it if you don't have a proper device to take this software on. So, here are the devices that you'll be getting the update on: All iPhones from the iPhone 5 or later All iPads from the iPad 2 or later Both the iPod touch 5th and 6th generation Both the iPhone 5 and iPod Touch 5th generation have been supported with current software for nearly four years now while ...

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    Three countries in Europe are now "trading up with installments" with anticipation that more will be on the way. Apple's new combined trade-in and financing program is no longer exclusive to the US — if only for a limited time. France, Italy and Spain are the latest territories to roll-out the scheme, all with the same promise: give your working iPhone (4s or later) in good condition and you'll pay less for an iPhone SE, iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus over 24 months. Unlike the US version of the program that is backed by Citizens One Financing, there's interest on these programs. Over in ...

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    Chalk another loss up for Apple. And the FBI. Around the same time that the agency ordered the iPhone manufacturer to assist in decrypting an iPhone 5c that belonged to a gunman in the San Bernardino shootings, Los Angeles police were able to source a "forensic cellphone expert" to crack into an iPhone 5s that belonged to the wife of actor Michael Jace. He's accused of murdering her back in May of 2014. In a search warrant obtained and reviewed by The Los Angeles Times, investigators wanted to support their claim that both husband and wife, April, were arguing "about their relationship". ...

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    The story of the FBI's efforts to access the iPhone 5c in its San Bernardino terrorism investigation may seem like it's over – and has been over for weeks, following the agency dropping its efforts to force Apple to help break into the phone – but the story keeps going strong. And why wouldn't it? This one has it all: technology, civil liberties, national security – we could go on. And even with the meat of the story wrapped up, we're continuing to learn more and more about how this all went down. Last week we got our first sense of just how much the FBI paid for access to whatever ...

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    The FBI would have loved to get Apple's help in breaking into the iPhone 5c from its San Bernardino terrorism investigation, but Apple wasn't playing ball. And before the courts could sort out just how much assistance the government could legally demand from the iPhone maker, the FBI backed out of the proceedings, claiming that it had managed to get into the smartphone without Apple at all. The agency's been keeping tight-lipped about exactly who helped it access the phone in question, but today we're learning a little more about just how this all happened, as FBI Director James Comey ...

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    From what we've been told, it seems that Apple had a fairly unsatisfying talk about how highly it puts security in front of its customers. Sure, there may have been some interesting new methods to show off here, but if we're to go by the conclusions one commentator who was at the technical briefing on Friday made, we may have something to chew over. Tech.pinions's Ben Bajarin made some observations from his attendance at the technical briefing. First off, a couple of carrots for us factoid chasers: iPhone users typically unlock their devices 80 times a day with heavier users unlocking ...

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    In addition to setting a dangerous precedent, compromising decades of diligent work in the service of user privacy protection, and possibly building a master key for all of the world’s iPhones that could always fall into the wrong hands, Apple’s supporters in its FBI deadlock also argued there was probably nothing relevant on Syed Farook’s handheld. Nothing about a supposed third San Bernardino assailant, nothing about other planned attacks or living terrorists affiliated with the two killed on December 2, 2015. And now, CBS News claims to have heard from a “law enforcement ...

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    Apple might never get to find out exactly how law enforcement managed to elude its “impenetrable” iOS encryption on an iPhone 5c owned by a San Bernardino shooter at the time of the heinous 2015 attack, but another important piece of the unlocking puzzle may have just been uncovered. Forget everything you thought you knew about the nature and authors of the cyber-intrusion, as “people familiar with the matter” tell The Washington Post it was actually “professional hackers who discovered and brought to the bureau at least one previously unknown software flaw.” No Israeli ...

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    Leonardo Fabbretti lost his adopted son, Dama, to bone cancer late last year. The grieving father wanted to see what was on his son's iPhone 6, but he wasn't able to access the contents of it. Even though Dama registered his dad's fingerprint for Touch ID, a restart occurred and required passcode entry — a passcode Fabbretti didn't know. After months of conversations with Apple support and a letter to Tim Cook, Fabbretti still had no recourse. Dama didn't use iCloud, so retrieving anything there was useless. However, after hearing media reports on the story, Israeli mobile forensics ...

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    When the government announced late last month that it no longer needed Apple's help to break into a locked iPhone 5c handset, we found ourselves left with more questions than answers. Would Apple face similar legal pressure in the future, the next time an encrypted device found itself tied to a terrorism investigation? Was there actually anything worth finding on the iPhone central to this case? And how exactly did the FBI ultimately crack its way in? It may be some time before we have all those answers, if we get them at all, but we know Apple itself has been especially curious about that ...

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    Late last month, the saga of the FBI and its locked iPhone 5c reached what seemed like an uneventful end, as the government backed down from its demands that Apple help break its own product in an effort to discover what, if any useful information might be stored on a handset once owned by terrorists. After Apple's big legal showdown fizzled out, where are we left? In the time since the feds told Apple they wouldn't be needing its help after all, we've continued to follow this story and its possible repercussions. This week we get a couple new updates, including word about our chances of ...

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    An Arkansas prosecutor's office was the first local law enforcement agency to request the FBI's help to decrypt a case-critical iPhone. It's expected to be the first of many — we know of quite a few requests for Apple to decrypt iPhones that may be retracted and sent instead to the FBI. "As has been our longstanding policy, the FBI will of course consider any tool that might be helpful to our partners," the FBI said in a letter to local authorities. "Please know that we will continue to do everything we can to help you consistent with our legal and policy constraints." That help may ...

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    Oh, how it must sting that Apple needs law enforcement cooperation now, after so many adamant refusals of its own assistance in a very delicate and complex terrorist attack investigation! But hands down the most ironic thing about this point of Cupertino’s FBI dispute is the intelligence service can’t be compelled to disclose the hacking technique used on Syed Farook’s iPhone 5c. Tim Cook could always sue, which would be even more ironic, and argue a so-called “Vulnerabilities Equities Process” applies here. Unfortunately, that’s not exactly an official or legal act, but rather ...

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    All’s well that ends well. But has the colossal Apple – FBI squabble on delicate matters like device encryption, data protection and counter-terrorism efforts really ended well for both parties involved? At least one? Not exactly, and ultimately, this long, contested battle will probably go down in the history books as a tie. On one hand, the Cupertino-based tech giant stood its ground against the US Department of Justice, and evaded any definitive laws passed in Congress forcing it to comply with court orders in cases of private information extraction from iDevices. On the other, law ...

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    The past month and a half have been a wild one for Apple, the FBI, digital security pundits, and users concerned with their privacy, as we followed the government's efforts to break into an encrypted iPhone 5c handset involved in a terrorism case. Apple was initially ordered to produce software that would enable the FBI to easily brute force its way into the phone, but Apple fought back, preparing for a legal showdown with broad consequences. We were all ready to see Apple get its day in court last week, but at the last moment the government changed its tune, reporting that it may have ...

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    Smartphone encryption is law enforcement's new boogeyman, and the right of citizens to protect their data and communications from prying eyes is directly under attack on multiple fronts. With so many forces conspiring to weaken our phones' security, we'd been looking forward to Apple getting its day in court to fight the government's efforts to compel it to re-write iOS code with the express purpose of defeating intentional security measures. Unfortunately for those of us anticipating this showdown, Apple never got its chance to defeat the order, and the DoJ backed out of the proceedings ...

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    From the beginning, the real problem of the whole Apple v. FBI case came down to decrypting an iPhone 5c that belonged to Syed Farook, one of the suspected shooters who killed 14 people at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California. The FBI and a magistrate judge ordered Apple to assist investigators in doing so. Apple has since been fighting against that order. Bullet point for bullet point, the rhetoric has flown fast between the two sides and the court of public opinion took its sways. But it could be that the underlying issue that triggered the potential question of ...

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    Next Tuesday is Apple's big day in court as it fights back against a government order attempting to compel the company to develop software that could threaten the security of its iOS mobile platform. Over the past few weeks, we've seen the merits of Apple's resistance debated to near-exhaustion, and supporters of both Apple and the feds alike are interested in seeing Apple's motion finally ruled upon. As we get ready to see how that story unfolds, an interesting new twist has come up, with the government requesting that Apple present witnesses for the purposes of cross-examination. Apple ...

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    If the FBI is able to enforce a court order that would force Apple to assist in the decryption of an iPhone 5c that was in the hands of a mass shooter, the company's engineers would have several options to resist against having to work on the order. In fact, they could potentially leave Apple off the hook in complying with the agency. The New York Times has interviewed several current and former Apple employees involved in the development and engineering of products and security as well as former executives. These employees stand with not only CEO Tim Cook's insistence that the ...

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    As a presidential candidate that prides himself on “telling it like it is”, as well as his ‘uge dingus, Donald Trump has sure been caught lying a lot lately. Trump University is under scrutiny, and so was the Republican front-runner’s knowledge of David Duke and the former KKK Grand Wizard’s anti-Semitic views in recent weeks. On a much lighter note, Tim Cook should probably be relieved to hear the controversial but surging politician couldn’t stay away from his iPhone for more than a few weeks. Remember the Apple boycott he randomly pleaded for during a rally back in February ...

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    Right now, the FBI is trying to compel Apple to develop new software that would allow it to more easily break the security on the locked iPhone 5c that's currently at the center of the San Bernardino terrorism investigation. As configured, the smartphone's set to permanently destroy the means to access its encrypted data if an incorrect PIN is entered too many times, and the FBI wants Apple to craft a special version of iOS that would disable this countermeasure. While Apple waits to see how its motion to dismiss the order plays out in court, security experts are questioning whether or not ...

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    The FBI, San Bernardino County District Attorney, the local Police Department and all their highly-placed politician supporters have never been able to provide a very compelling argument for why a specific iPhone 5c owned by a terrorist needs to be decrypted. Until Friday, that is, when San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan made a fairly solid case for the unlocking of the device for the sake of clarity. Clarity regarding the number of December 2, 2015 assailants. According to Burguan, “the majority” of surviving witnesses testified to seeing or hearing only two Inland Regional ...

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    Although it’s probably far from settled, the legal battle between Apple and the FBI over a specific iPhone’s encryption but actually way more than that already provoked all the feelings. You may have started off somewhere in the middle, understanding the stances of both involved parties, and you likely groaned at Trump’s boycott pleas, shed a tear as a San Bernardino survivor’s husband announced his unlikely support for Cupertino, and laughed when an iPad Pro froze in front of Congress. While it’s virtually impossible now to maintain a neutral position concerning the privacy war ...

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    Various polls conducted on the heels of Apple’s refusal to comply with a court order and assist the FBI in decrypting an iPhone 5c potentially containing information relevant to the San Bernardino shooting investigation have perhaps surprisingly shown most Americans don’t share Tim Cook’s stance on privacy. But even as all remaining Republican presidential candidates and miscellaneous public institutions turn up the heat on Apple to give up security for this “particular” device, the tech giant’s opposition is unflinching. More so after an unexpected favorable New York district ...

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