Posts tagged with: how-to
  • by |

    I've been a T-Mobile customer for well over a decade. Since I picked up my T-Mobile G1 (way back in the day) I've been a happy user of both the carrier and Android as a platform. As time progressed I loved the ability to tether other devices to my smartphone and use some of my 5GB of data on a tablet or laptop. I was never a heavy user of tethered data, and only used it when WiFi wasn't an option. Then T-Mobile tried to tell everyone that "tethered data" was somehow different from "device data" and phones bearing the T-Mobile brand forced users to purchase a separate tethering plan. ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    The LTE version of the 2013 Nexus 7 should work on AT&T, T-Mobile, and even Verizon LTE. That last one isn't as easy as you might think that it should be. Why? Verizon hasn't added the IMEI numbers from the Nexus 7 to their "approved" list. There is a work-around, and it's relatively simple -- but it does require either a helpful store manager, or a little bit of social engineering. Hit play, and watch as I go on-location and under-cover to tell you how to get your Nexus 7 to work on Verizon LTE. The only thing keeping the Nexus 7 from working with Verizon's LTE is the lack of its IMEI ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Easily, one of the coolest features brought along with KitKat – or Android 4.4 – on the Nexus 5 is the Phone application. In retrospect, it's something which should have existed since mobile phones married mobile broadband connections. Nearby businesses are discoverable straight from the dialer. Open the Phone application and tap the search bar at the top of the display. Speak or type any general or specific term, such as "coffee." The three nearest results will appear in the Nearby Places section. Tap the thumbnail to open the details, or simply tap the name to call the business. ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Every time a new version of Android comes out it's only natural that people will want to run it on their Android-powered device -- even if it's not a Nexus. Nexus devices usually get the latest version of Android faster than their OEM counterparts, but there are still some things that you can do to get a KitKat experience on your non-KitKat device today! First of all you'll need a smartphone or tablet running Android 4.0 or higher. The phone I'll show you in the video isn't exactly "old" (it's a Sprint HTC One Max), but the same process should work for you, as long as you're running 4.0+. ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Android 4.4 KitKat is literally days old, so how can you get it on your Android-powered smartphone or tablets? Luckily, Google released the code into the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) and developers have been working non-stop to bring the latest goodness to otherwise unsupported devices. Are you feeling a little daring and want to give KitKat a try on your device? If so, here's what you'll need to do: 0. Assume the risk Doing this sort of thing could render your device useless -- or awesome -- but don't continue unless you're willing to assume the risk. 1. Prerequisites Next, you'll ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    At long last, Apple released iOS 7 to the masses today, bringing all newer iOS devices up to speed with the latest features. Visually, the software is quite different than before. Though, fundamentally, it's the exact same software as iOS has always been. We've shown you what's new in this version of software with a tour of last week's GM release. The task switcher looks and operates differently, Control Center is a settings toggle panel that can be access from within virtually any application, and home screen folders no longer have a 16 app limit. The changes, although minute, are quite ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    How many times do you turn your smartphone on each day? Wouldn't it be nice if you could simply swipe your finger across the screen to wake it up? I'm not talking about "swipe to unlock", this is "swipe to wake" -- or "sweep to wake". I've heard it both ways. The concept is simple: you pick up your phone and swipe your finger across the screen. As if by magic the screen turns on and you're either looking at your lock-screen or your homescreen -- however you've got your phone configured. The "swipe" takes the place of finding and pressing your power button. If all this sounds somewhat ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Our mobile devices are becoming more and more important in our everyday lives. We use them to store everything from our credentials for social media to our calendars and email. Some of us even use them as our everyday wallet. With all this personal information, and access to almost every intimate detail of our lives, we should all be taking special care with our smartphones and tablets. Above all, you should lock your Android. Locking can be something as easy as sliding your finger across the screen. No, that doesn't secure your device from unauthorized access, but it does reduce the ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Android 4.3 was announced and released earlier this week with an OTA update promised to start rolling out immediately. Like many of you, I still haven't gotten my OTA update, and I'm getting antsy. Luckily, Google has released the system images for all the Nexus devices that support Android 4.3, and with just a little bit of tech-know-how, you're on your way. Here is how to get Android 4.3 on your Nexus today! How-to get Android 4.3 The first thing you'll want to do is backup anything that you don't want to lose, this process will return your Nexus 7 to factory defaults. After that, ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    When Google Maps for Android was originally announced, it lacked one very important feature: offline mode. On the surface this wasn't a big deal, after all, we are always connected to the cloud when we're on our smartphones, right? Unfortunately, no, we're not, especially when it comes to navigation. Driving through rolling hills in the middle of Nowheresville, USA or even through urban canyons, cellular data can be slow, or absent completely. For people depending on their smartphone's navigation suite to get them from point A to point B, they could quite literally be lost. We needed a way ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Infrared (IR) has been used in various consumer electronics since the 1980s. It was even used in smartphones and PDAs in the late 1990s and early 2000s. But IR abruptly died off in light of newer smartphones, mobile operating systems and better methods of transferring data between two mobile devices. This year, several OEMs have come forward with flagships bearing IR blasters along their top edges. The HTC One and Samsung Galaxy S 4, for example, both come with infrared capabilities. And using the respective applications on each, you can point towards your entertainment system and control ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    As mobile experts, we do everything we can to look at every new device subjectively. You may hear us cracking jokes on a live show or voicing our personal opinions in editorials. But when it becomes time to get serious, when it's review time, we look at a phone (or tablet) from not only our own perspective, but as many others as possible – the perspective of the target demographic, the perspective of the general consumer, the standpoint of a power user, a modder or even a first-time buyer. We all look at a new phone differently. When we pull it out of the box and tear the plastic off, ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Everybody likes to customize their home screen to fit their style and personality. It's one of the things that makes Android so great! Your ability to customize your home screen is almost limitless! CodeG: Google Doodle Widget, for instance, lets you put the latest Google doodle on your home screen. Doing so adds some whimsy to your smartphone or tablet, and keeps your device looking fresh with content that changes daily. But CodeG doesn't stop there. In addition to being able to pick which geography you'd like your doodle to be pulled from, tapping on the widget opens Google Now. Some ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Android users aren't forced into a life of running just one ROM forever like owners of some "other" devices are. Users can change the way their device looks by changing wallpaper, widgets, and even the launcher (the app that is used to start every app). But Android takes that one step further: after rooting, users can flash almost any ROM they want on their device. The reasons for flashing a custom ROM are as varied at the people doing the flashing. Perhaps they want to change the look and feel of their device. Maybe they want to get rid of bloatware. They might want to get rid of their ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    As applications and games are updated to support 1080p graphics (and beyond), file sizes have increased exponentially over the last year, making inbuilt storage worth its weight in gold. Just two years ago, 2GB and 4GB was not uncommon for built-in storage. Now the standard – or minimum, rather – is 16GB, yet that still is not enough for every scenario. It forces users to have to choose between what applications, games, music, pictures and videos they store on their device. What's worse is microSD card support, or expandable storage, is becoming a rarity for some OEMs. Until 32GB ...

    Share
    Read On
Mobile Version