Posts tagged with: honeycomb
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    I've got an Android-powered smartphone, and I've pretty much got an app for everything. I've got an Android-powered tablet, too. Yes, it will run the majority of smartphone apps, but why are there so few apps that are either designed for tablets, or run really well on them? I could bring up the Android-powered Google TV, and the literally dozens of apps that you can get for it, but I'll be nice -- for now. Non-Market Tablets Android-powered tablets are relatively new to the market, and they're fragmented. There, I said it. But it's not Android that's fragmented, it's the "custom launchers" ...

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    When Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich was announced we were told that, like Honeycomb before it, more emphasis would be placed on the graphics processor. We even saw a new addition in the Developer section of the Settings that lets users "force GPU rendering". What is the GPU? The GPU is the Graphics Processing Unit. It's very much like the CPU, but instead of crunching numbers and taking care of tasks for the operating system and hardware, the GPU renders graphical information and puts it on the screen for you. The CPU can process graphical instructions just fine, but doing so takes time ...

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    What makes a smartphone "smart"? The apps of course! Every week we will feature some of the best newest or updated apps for the three big names in the mobile industry; iPhone, Windows Phone, and Android. We have sifted through hundred of apps and have deemed these 12 the most noteworthy for you, the smartphone enthusiast. To download any of these apps to your respective platform just click on the name of the app to launch the AppStore, Windows Marketplace, or Google Play.   iPhone Kitchenator – A paid app that costs $0.99 Kitchenator is a unit convertor for nearly everything related ...

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    Cupcake, Doughnut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich. If this weren't Pocketnow you might think I was trying to figure out what to have for dessert, but you're a smart cookie and you know I'm talking about the different versions of the Android operating system. (Are you hungry? I'm hungry now.) Other than finding out what the next confection is going to be made into a statue and placed on the lawn in front of Google's HQ, do people really care what version of the OS they're running on their phones? I do. I want to run the latest and greatest on everything. I'm so ...

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    Before we dive too deep (after all, love is such a strong word) people like Android. About 51% of smartphone users are running Android on their device. By February 2012 there were over 300 million Android phones (not including tablets) in the hands of consumers, with an additional 850,000 phones and tablets being activated every day. Obviously Android is doing something right. But that's just people who like Android. Some of them may not even know they're running Android, but it gets the job done and they're not at all worried about the nuts and bolts of what make their gadgets tick. Why ...

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    If you've used an Android-powered smartphone or tablet for any length of time you've probably run into more than one instance where the "back" button didn't do what you were expecting it to. Sometimes the back button hides the keyboard, sometimes it takes you to the previous app or back to the desktop, and sometimes it navigates you back to previous screens in an app. Before we dive into how the back button works today, let's review a little history. Looking Back at Buttons Long ago -- okay, maybe it wasn't that long ago -- Android's had physical buttons on them. Usually there were four, ...

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    The ZTE Optik on Sprint may not be the most powerful tablet around, with a dual-core 1.2Ghz Snapdragon under its hood, but its $100-on-contract pricing makes it a whole heck of a lot more affordable than competitors like the eight-inch Xyboard on Verizon. For those of you who have become fans of the Optik, there's a maintenance update headed your way to deliver a whole bunch of fixes to keep the Honeycomb tablet working in peak condition. Today Sprint announced the first software update to be released for the Optik, bringing the tablet up to system software B09. The changelog the carrier ...

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    The HTC One X, the Taiwanese phone maker's flagship Android phone, has a "fantastic" "infinity screen", as Brandon concluded in our review. However, some owners are having issues with the phone. If you head over to the XDA Developers thread at the source link below you will see that people are complaining about screen flickering. There are also some reports of backlight flickering too and, while some have the issues, others can't reproduce them. There's also a theory according to which this is all just a driver problem and an over-the-air update should fix everything. Check out the video ...

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    Ever since Ice Cream Sandwich came out, we've seen plenty of apps updated to include new functionality you'll only see on Android 4.0. Granted, there was the same sort of thing going on before to an extent, like special Honeycomb versions of popular apps, but that's not making us any less anxious to see ICS finally released for our existing Android smartphones and tablets, so that we can enjoy all these latest app features. While there's nothing much to be done about speeding that up, in the meantime Google's released an update for its Android Gmail app, bringing some of those ...

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    This is the first in a continuing series of articles on controversial or disputed topics in mobile technology. We're calling it the "Brutally Honest Question Corner." The leaks have transitioned from a few drips to a sizable deluge: the release of the latest in Samsung's popular Galaxy S line, one of the most anticipated Android smartphones ever, seems to be just over the horizon. On the eve of this product launch, Samsung seems to be directing more and more resources to strengthening its branding efforts. And I've never been less interested. Like a lot of gadget lovers, I was first ...

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    Watch this week's Android Revolution as we go through what's hot and what's not inside the world of Google's Android project. We start today's show going all the recent leaks about the Samsun Galaxy S III and the possibility of mixing a quad-core processor with LTE connectivity for Samsung's next-generation Exynos processor. We later go through all the recent leaks regarding a Google Nexus tablet built by Asus. We then discuss all this week's coverage for Android and detail all the recent ROM developments for HTC and Samsung. We end the hot section talking about Sprint and HTC's event ...

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    Samsung, in a seeming attempt to have the most tablets on the market at one time, has just recently released their Galaxy Tab 7.7 with LTE from Verizon. Similar in most respects to the original Galaxy Tab 7.7 (you can read our review on this variation here), this newest rev also includes LTE/CDMA radios from Verizon. An exciting form factor with a high-speed data connection, how could we resist taking a look? But can it survive against the current tablet market? Were any of the problems mentioned in our previous coverage resolved in this version? Read our review to find out! BOX CONTENTS ...

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    The New iPad is already out there and if Verizon is your favorite carrier you are able to grab one. The Amazon Kindle Fire is one of the most popular Android tablets on the market and the Galaxy Tab 10.1 from Samsung is also a 4G LTE-enabled choice on Big Red. We're putting the latest Android addition to Verizon's tablet line-up, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7, against the aforementioned alternatives. We're taking a look at form factors -- whether you want to go with a large, 9.7/10-incher, a smaller 7.7-inch dimension or the smallest size of 7-inches on the Fire -- usability, user interface ...

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    The Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 is one of the most useful tablets that I've had the opportunity to get to own. The 7.7's size lends itself well to carrying around with you almost everywhere you go, and is not so big that it's a chore to do so. Unfortunately, it runs Android 3.2 Honeycomb and rooting has been a little complicated. After quite a bit of research I've been able to put together a method that's relatively easy, tested to work on the WiFi version of the tablet, and doesn't require KIES or Odin. (If you've got an HSPA+ or LTE version and want to try we'd love to hear your results in ...

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    It's well-nigh impossible to look at Sony's Tablet P without conjuring up some memories of Kyocera's Echo from last year. After all, both designs employ dual touchscreens in a convertible layout that lets you collapse the device while carrying it. Kyocera's attempt never caught-on in a big way, so we're anxious to see if Sony has what it takes to succeed where others have failed. We'll be getting our chance quite soon, with Sony announcing that the Tablet P is set to land on AT&T this Sunday, March 3. Even when folded closed, there's no denying that the Tablet P is bit of a beast. Besides ...

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