Posts tagged with: Google

Google was founded in 1996 by Sergey Brin and Larry Page. The company started off as a new search engine that became very popular and is the most commonly used to this day. Google began expanding its services by acquiring many companies such as Keyhole, Inc. and YouTube. In September 2008, the G1 was released, made by HTC the G1 was the first smartphone running Google's own Android operating system. Google continues to expand and innovate in several areas with Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) being Google's first operating systems designed for tablet computers. Read on for the latest Google news, reviews and videos:

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    Updated with links to stream and download the high-quality audio version of the podcast, as well as timecodes for all the stories mentioned. We hope you enjoyed – see you next week! Is Nokia's new tablet just an iPad ripoff – or just what Android needs? Will Gorilla Glass 4 finally stop you from shattering your smartphone? And is the Gear S a good enough smartwatch to make the dumbphone obsolete? These are the pressing questions on the docket this week as the mobile industry prepares to end a wild year on a weird note, and we're gonna tackle them one by one in the ruthlessly silly ...

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    It used to be that if your phone wanted to silently alert you about something, it would fire up the old notification light. At a glance, it was capable of grabbing your attention, and multi-color varieties could easily clue you in to what sort of content was waiting for you. But in recent years, it feels like the stalwart notification LED has fallen by the wayside, replaced by richer technologies that not only tell you about the presence of new info, but are able to directly share it with you – things like Glance, Active Display, or its cousin, Ambient Display – and that's to say ...

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    If you can’t decide between the new Nexus and the new iPad, you’re probably hung up on one of two factors: ecosystem or price. Nothing we say here will change the fact that the Nexus 9 is about $100 cheaper, and if you’re already invested in Apple’s or Android’s walled garden, the decision is already made based on which smartphone you’re carrying. Probably. But if you’re thinking about jumping platforms, or this will be your first tablet, there are a few differences worth discussing. Those differences span hardware, software and day-to-day performance – and the end ...

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    Android 5.0 Lollipop, the latest iteration of Google's mobile operating system, has been rolling out since the beginning of the month. Not everyone has gotten it yet, and some won't get the update at all. Because of the rapid development cycle of consumer electronics these days, OEMs don't have much incentive to update "old" devices with new versions of operating systems, it's much more profitable just to sell you a new device with the new OS already on it. One of the purposes of the Nexus program is so Google can showcase its latest and greatest software on a hardware reference ...

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    Now that carrier sales of the Nexus 6 have begun, we've had the opportunity to check out just what level of impact the involvement of these companies will have on the handset you take home. Really, what carriers like AT&T are doing doesn't look too, too bad – well, assuming that the phone functions at all. As it turns out, there seems to be a nasty bug affecting these Nexus 6 models, one severe enough to have AT&T sending its initial Nexus 6 stock back to Motorola. Revealed in a leaked AT&T doc, the situation is described as one of Motorola delivering the Nexus 6 with ...

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    One of the big success stories for Android 5.0 Lollipop on Nexus phones is how the Nexus 4 got its official update from Google – especially considering how the previous year's Galaxy Nexus didn't even make it to KitKat. Of course, we were eager to check this out for ourselves, and as soon as the update became available, we were quick to flash it and show you how the new software performed. But while this continued Google support is great, it doesn't come without a price – one that might not matter to everyone, but it's an issue we've been dealing with for awhile: LTE support. Luckily, ...

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    This year the latest Nexus phone is being welcomed with open arms by all the major carriers in the US, joining Google and its own Play Store sales of the Nexus 6. But if you pick up the phone from one of these networks, just what are you in store for? After all, the Nexus line is heralded as as the purest of Android experiences, yet anyone with even a modicum of experience with carriers knows that they'll do everything they can get away with to influence your phone's software. Now with the first carrier-sold Nexus 6 handsets arriving, we're finally getting a full picture of just how these ...

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    In software, very rarely is an operation “free.” Want that menu to have a cute scroll-down animation when you tap it? Sure, but that's going to take up processor time: you can have a system without it that runs slightly faster, or keep the animation and suffer a tiny performance hit. Our desire for attractive, rich software is often compensated for by the arrival of increasingly powerful SoCs, but that still doesn't change the fact that the more we ask our phone to do, the slower the same hardware's going to run. With Android 5.0 Lollipop, Google is making its platform's full-disk ...

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    This year, more major carriers than ever before are interested in the latest Nexus smartphone, with all the big players here in the US either already selling or soon planning to welcome the Nexus 6. And while that's great for the phone's exposure, the way these sales have been happening is a little unusual. While most handsets that sell full-price in the mid-$600 range (like the Nexus 6 does) see on-contract pricing of about $200, the Nexus 6 has been attracting the kind of premium pricing normally seen with more expensive devices: AT&T asked $250 for the phone, while Sprint wanted ...

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    If you're looking to pick up a Nexus 9, Google's only too eager to ship one your way; both the 16GB and 32GB Nexus 9 are currently in stock, in either black or white (sorry, sand fans). At least, that's the situation with the WiFi-only version of the tablet, and while that might cut it when you've got a smartphone to tether to, what if you're craving the fully independent connectivity you only get with an LTE-capable tablet? Google hasn't yet begun sales of the LTE-equipped Nexus 9, noting only that it's “coming soon.” But how soon is “soon?” While Google's still not talking, one ...

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    Getting your hands on Android 5.0 Lollipop right now is kind of a mess. Most applicable Nexus devices have already received it, some NVIDIA Shield products have also gotten some action, and we should see it rolling to the Google Play edition devices very soon as well. We also know that OEMs like HTC have already committed to pushing Android 5.0 to existing flagship smartphones in the next few months, but if you want an early glimpse of what it'll look like, let's all thank the Internet. We have some leaked photos of what seems to be HTC Sense 6 running on top Android 5.0 Lollipop. We say ...

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    It's been about six months now since Google announced its Android One project at Google I/O, an effort to streamline handset development and empower manufacturers to quickly and easily get cheap, versatile hardware into the hands of customers. If you're a smartphone user in the West, you may not be up on all the Android One developments since, but shoppers in India have already had the opportunity to get on board the Android One train for a couple months now. One of the many selling points of Android One has been the level of control Google has over software, with promises of speedy system ...

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    October 29th, 2014 was the day that Google began to take pre-orders for the Nexus 6 in these United States. Depending on your source, the ordering period lasted for anywhere from 45 to 60 seconds. Not long after Google announced that it would be making more stock available every Wednesday, but these allotments have also met with terribly availability. As I've mentioned in the past, I try not to get hardware through "special" means. I want to go through the same process as you, the same time as you, and undergo the same experience that you do. This puts me as close to you, the Pocketnow ...

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    With smartphones having risen to the the level of popularity they now enjoy, and more and more users making their phones a major, if not the primary way they interact with websites, it's hardly a surprise that many sites deliver mobile-optimized versions of their content, designed to better fit on smaller screens and support the sorts of interactions favored by touchscreen input. But not every site has gotten the memo just yet, and it can be frustrating when you're using your phone to pull up a page that seems to be doing all it can to make your life difficult: tiny text, or maybe a ...

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    The evolution of Android over the years has oftentimes been the direct result of nifty features of OEM skins. With the Android 5.0 release, Google produced a Motorola-esque Ambient Display mode, along with other things similar to what we've already seen on other phones. One of the features we'd have liked to seen carried over to stock is one that companies like LG and HTC have had for a while – tap-to-wake. And, if code commits to the Android Open Source Project are correct, then there was Nexus 6 tap-to-wake support once upon a time... except the device didn't launch with it. Perhaps ...

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