Posts tagged with: encryption
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    All of us are born with certain "natural rights" - rights which are are not dependent on the laws, customs, or beliefs of any particular culture or government, and are therefore universal and inalienable. Among those are the right to privacy, of which I'm an advocate. Since the world's governments aren't doing a very good job respecting privacy (let alone protecting it like they should be), the responsibility falls to us, individually. Thankfully, technology gives us the tools we need to build solutions that will help deter all but the most determined parties from invading our ...

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    The story of the FBI's efforts to access the iPhone 5c in its San Bernardino terrorism investigation may seem like it's over – and has been over for weeks, following the agency dropping its efforts to force Apple to help break into the phone – but the story keeps going strong. And why wouldn't it? This one has it all: technology, civil liberties, national security – we could go on. And even with the meat of the story wrapped up, we're continuing to learn more and more about how this all went down. Last week we got our first sense of just how much the FBI paid for access to whatever ...

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    The iPhone belonging to a confessed drug dealer in Brooklyn has been cracked into. But it wasn't opened with the zero-day exploit that the FBI purchased supposedly from a gray hat hacker. Someone else just knew the passcode for the iPhone. Prosecutors in the case said that an unidentified person turned in the code. The Justice Department had been requesting for Apple's assistance in opening up the iPhone, running iOS 7, for months. This case pre-dates the San Bernadino debacle that brought the nation face-first into a public debate about privacy, security and encryption. The drug dealer ...

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    Apple may soon find a Great Wall coming in the way of further business growth in China. While growing its market share in mobile phones in recent years and being the only US-based content and services ecosystem to comply to the communist regime's rigorous censorship demands to do business in the country, it may have grown too far, too fast. Two anonymous sources close to the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television say the authority demanded Apple close down its iBooks Store and iTunes Movies and that the company complied. Apple, through a spokesperson, stated ...

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    Update: The podcast is up now and will be sent out at 3pm Eastern on Friday. The HTC 10 makes us wonder if any phone can really be perfect. Galaxy Note 6 rumors are building steam. What might we see on Samsung's next phablet? With the flagship phone market maturing, we'll take a look at why people are waiting longer to upgrade their phones? We've been hard at work covering news stories and producing the next generation of phone reviews. We recently started a new series of videos delving deeper into camera performance and phone comparisons, and of course we'll be tackling your questions and ...

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    If you're in Canada and you don't want the Royal Canadian Mounted Police peeping through your BlackBerry's content, get rid of it. Chances are, if that phone's not for business, the agency has a way to get into it — likely thanks to BlackBerry. An investigation lead by Motherboard and Vice tells of "over one million" BBM messages obtained and then read by breaking BlackBerry's standard end-to-end encryption. The messages were used to pin down suspects of a mafia-related murder in Montreal. The company uses a "global encryption key" on all of its devices while corporate phones pass ...

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    From what we've been told, it seems that Apple had a fairly unsatisfying talk about how highly it puts security in front of its customers. Sure, there may have been some interesting new methods to show off here, but if we're to go by the conclusions one commentator who was at the technical briefing on Friday made, we may have something to chew over. Tech.pinions's Ben Bajarin made some observations from his attendance at the technical briefing. First off, a couple of carrots for us factoid chasers: iPhone users typically unlock their devices 80 times a day with heavier users unlocking ...

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    Back in February, when Apple and the FBI were still gearing up to face off in a court battle over the extent to which Apple could be compelled to assist the agency in its efforts to break into a secured smartphone, Apple scored a separate victory on a similar case in a New York court. There, the judge ruled that the government's attempt to force Apple's assistance relied on an overly broad interpretation of the All Writs Act. The feds didn't like the sound of that, and have since appealed the ruling to a higher court. Today Apple filed its response to that action, and the language the ...

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    Update: The podcast will be on your podcatchers starting at 3am Eastern on April 16. Enjoy! The HTC 10 is taking the Android world by storm. Can this one phone turn the tides for HTC? Our LG G5 coverage is in full swing, and everything you want to know about this phone will be answered. Lastly, another "backdoor" encryption bill is headed to congress, what might this mean for consumer tech? We've been hard at work covering news stories and producing the next generation of phone reviews. We recently started a new series of videos delving deeper into camera performance and phone comparisons, ...

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    In addition to setting a dangerous precedent, compromising decades of diligent work in the service of user privacy protection, and possibly building a master key for all of the world’s iPhones that could always fall into the wrong hands, Apple’s supporters in its FBI deadlock also argued there was probably nothing relevant on Syed Farook’s handheld. Nothing about a supposed third San Bernardino assailant, nothing about other planned attacks or living terrorists affiliated with the two killed on December 2, 2015. And now, CBS News claims to have heard from a “law enforcement ...

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    In addition to being the most popular smartphone vendor around the globe by a landslide, and producing the two devices consumers and experts appear to agree are the best of the best, Samsung today adds another important gold medal to its increasingly crowded trophy room. This one’s a little unexpected, which probably makes the win that much sweeter, as we all tend to associate BlackBerry or Apple’s names first and foremost with top-drawer mobile security, impenetrable encryption, and data protection. But surprise, surprise, market research firm Gartner ranked Samsung Knox number one in ...

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    Apple might never get to find out exactly how law enforcement managed to elude its “impenetrable” iOS encryption on an iPhone 5c owned by a San Bernardino shooter at the time of the heinous 2015 attack, but another important piece of the unlocking puzzle may have just been uncovered. Forget everything you thought you knew about the nature and authors of the cyber-intrusion, as “people familiar with the matter” tell The Washington Post it was actually “professional hackers who discovered and brought to the bureau at least one previously unknown software flaw.” No Israeli ...

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    Apple may have never gotten its day in court to make its case for why the FBI shouldn't be able to force it to develop software capable of breaking iOS security, but the fight over access to user data is far from over. The controversy surrounding the pressure the feds put on Apple to help it crack into a secured iPhone 5c was just the most recent and most public instance of the ongoing clash between the government and tech companies over encryption. And just as those companies behind the software and services that power our mobile devices aren't backing down from their commitment to user ...

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    Leonardo Fabbretti lost his adopted son, Dama, to bone cancer late last year. The grieving father wanted to see what was on his son's iPhone 6, but he wasn't able to access the contents of it. Even though Dama registered his dad's fingerprint for Touch ID, a restart occurred and required passcode entry — a passcode Fabbretti didn't know. After months of conversations with Apple support and a letter to Tim Cook, Fabbretti still had no recourse. Dama didn't use iCloud, so retrieving anything there was useless. However, after hearing media reports on the story, Israeli mobile forensics ...

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    An Arkansas prosecutor's office was the first local law enforcement agency to request the FBI's help to decrypt a case-critical iPhone. It's expected to be the first of many — we know of quite a few requests for Apple to decrypt iPhones that may be retracted and sent instead to the FBI. "As has been our longstanding policy, the FBI will of course consider any tool that might be helpful to our partners," the FBI said in a letter to local authorities. "Please know that we will continue to do everything we can to help you consistent with our legal and policy constraints." That help may ...

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    Update: !yaD 'slooF lirpA yppaH How can we tell if the iPhone SE is a sales success? What's new for Windows 10 at Build 2016? Could you use your smart PHONE without any phone call capabilities? We've been hard at work covering news stories and producing the next generation of phone reviews. We recently started a new series of videos delving deeper into camera performance and we're taking a closer look at mobile audio hardware, but of course we'll be tackling your questions and comments. Make sure you're charged and ready! It's time for episode 194 of the Pocketnow Weekly! Watch the video ...

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    Thanks to outside guidance, the FBI has successfully cracked into a suspected mass shooter's iPhone. Now, prosecutors from Arkansas want to take advantage of the agency's newfound skills and the agency has agreed to provide those skills to them. Faulkner County Prosecuting Attorney Cody Hiland said that his office and the Conway Police Department wanted the FBI's help in decrypting an iPhone and an iPod central to a double homicide case. Within a day of the request, the agency had agreed to provide that help. The two suspects in the case have had the start of their trial delayed until June ...

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    The FBI may be done asking Apple to crack into an iPhone 5c from San Bernardino for it. Apple wants the agency to give up getting its engineers to decrypt an iPhone in Brooklyn. But it's not just the FBI that has asked help with accessing data from case-critical iPhones. And it's not just iPhones that law enforcement agencies have wanted to get into. The American Civil Liberties Union has uncovered 63 cases in which various agencies under the Department of Justice have compelled Apple or Google to assist in breaking the encryption of mobile devices through a 1789 statute called the All ...

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    Oh, how it must sting that Apple needs law enforcement cooperation now, after so many adamant refusals of its own assistance in a very delicate and complex terrorist attack investigation! But hands down the most ironic thing about this point of Cupertino’s FBI dispute is the intelligence service can’t be compelled to disclose the hacking technique used on Syed Farook’s iPhone 5c. Tim Cook could always sue, which would be even more ironic, and argue a so-called “Vulnerabilities Equities Process” applies here. Unfortunately, that’s not exactly an official or legal act, but rather ...

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    All’s well that ends well. But has the colossal Apple – FBI squabble on delicate matters like device encryption, data protection and counter-terrorism efforts really ended well for both parties involved? At least one? Not exactly, and ultimately, this long, contested battle will probably go down in the history books as a tie. On one hand, the Cupertino-based tech giant stood its ground against the US Department of Justice, and evaded any definitive laws passed in Congress forcing it to comply with court orders in cases of private information extraction from iDevices. On the other, law ...

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    We're at a crossroads in Apple's fight to overturn an order issued by the FBI to assist in decrypting an alleged mass shooter's iPhone. The FBI is currently testing a hacking method it has learned from "an outside party." Apple is now saying that if the agency finds success in decrypting the San Bernardino iPhone without the company's assistance, a similar case going on in New York could go without its help. That's the argument Cupertino makes in a letter filed to federal court in Brooklyn. Apple is involved in a case where it is being asked by the Justice Department to help decrypt an ...

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    From the beginning, the real problem of the whole Apple v. FBI case came down to decrypting an iPhone 5c that belonged to Syed Farook, one of the suspected shooters who killed 14 people at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California. The FBI and a magistrate judge ordered Apple to assist investigators in doing so. Apple has since been fighting against that order. Bullet point for bullet point, the rhetoric has flown fast between the two sides and the court of public opinion took its sways. But it could be that the underlying issue that triggered the potential question of ...

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    Along with a new iPhone today came the much-awaited update to iOS 9.3, betas be done with us. Night Shift finally gets implemented, putting the sword into F.lux for any hopes on the App Store. It basically adjusts the hue of your screen to cut down on blue light emissions, harmful to your eyes in the dark. The Notes app now gets Touch ID or password protection, too. Health can suggest apps for you to use while News now has three new sections for its articles: Top Stories, Editors' Picks and a trending tab. CarPlay integration brings an improved maps experience and song suggestions for your ...

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    Tim Cook’s defense against the FBI in the now infamous San Bernardino iPhone 5c unlocking case has been as simple as it was reasonable from the get-go. There’s no way to decrypt just one phone without making sure the resulting “backdoor” wouldn’t be used on many other devices, and causing a precedent for law enforcement to then seek similar “assistance” in less serious investigations feels like a very bad idea. But while Apple avoided to make this argument for obvious reasons, there’s also the question of whether its encryption methods are truly impenetrable. Some security ...

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    If the FBI is able to enforce a court order that would force Apple to assist in the decryption of an iPhone 5c that was in the hands of a mass shooter, the company's engineers would have several options to resist against having to work on the order. In fact, they could potentially leave Apple off the hook in complying with the agency. The New York Times has interviewed several current and former Apple employees involved in the development and engineering of products and security as well as former executives. These employees stand with not only CEO Tim Cook's insistence that the ...

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