Posts tagged with: Editorial
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    When LG announced its 2014 flagship smartphone late last month, the new device's camera was one of the halo features the company focused on (haw) during its unveiling. LG had impressed us with optical achievements before: the optically-stabilized shooter built into last year's G2 was one of the highlights of our review of that device, and even its OIS-less counterpart in the curvaceous G Flex managed a few fun shots during our time with it. But this time, LG intimated, was different. A 13MP sensor with a laser-assisted autofocus, dual-LED flash, and something called "OIS+" provides the ...

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    Last week, Apple announced iOS 8 at its opening keynote for WWDC 2014. That comes as no real surprise as WWDC is where we typically meet the early incarnations of Apple's newest software versions. For the last several years, though, we've closed out of our WWDC keynote livesream and liveblog tabs with a subtle bitter taste in our mouths. Let's be honest, iOS 4, iOS 5, iOS 6 and iOS 7 were all pretty boring. Sure, iOS 7 was a whole lot better to look at than previous versions, but useful features in the update were few and far between. We got Control Center, a better Notification Center, ...

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    In the tablet space, Samsung is a quickly growing giant. Almost single-handed, Samsung has cut Apple's tablet market share in half – from over 60 percent in 2012 to 30 percent in Q1 this year – while snapping up 23 percent of the global tablet share in Q1. We never had any doubt this would be the case, even with how half-baked the first two or three generations of its tablets were. Take the original Galaxy Tab, for example. It was a 7-inch knee-jerk reaction to the iPad. It ran Android, of course, but it was a stretched version of the phone-based OS. Google had not yet developed a home ...

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    Our smartphones offer us many ways to communicate with each other. We can send SMS messages to one another. We can use Facebook to chat. Twitter lets us send direct messages back and form. Google's Hangouts offers us similar functionalities. On iOS there's iMessage. And let's not forget Skype, AIM, Yahoo! Messenger, Jabber, ChatOn, Kik, Snapchat, and who knows how many others. One could make the argument that there are simply too many ways with which we can communicate with one another. I wouldn't argue against that. The bigger issues, however, are identification and standards. If you want ...

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    HTC makes some great high-end devices, and we gave the One M8 one of the highest scores that we've ever given a device. But that's a "flagship" phone, what about the mid-tier? Luckily HTC has you covered there as well, in more ways that one! When diving to the middle, HTC had a couple ways it could go to keep the price of the device down. One option was to make the device smaller, the other was to drop the specifications - or both. We've already told you what we think of the HTC Desire 816 in our full review: a mid-tier phone with flagship DNA. Similarly, we've given the HTC One mini 2 ...

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    More than most, I want to believe the tablet-computer hybrid is possible. In fact, I know it is. That's exactly why I moved absolutely as many tasks as possible over to my iPad mini from the MacBook Pro. With the exception of intensive video editing and some of the fine-tunings of publishing stories here on Pocketnow, I can easily perform most of my daily tasks with the iPad mini paired with the ZAGGkeys Cover Bluetooth keyboard. It's a nifty little accessory that essentially transforms the iPad mini into a miniature, underpowered netbook. Why bother, though, if it's underpowered and I ...

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    People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones - but what about people with glass smartphones? Pocketnow Power User is a series of videos and articles aimed at the "average Joe", explaining core concepts that might seem confusing, even daunting. On this episode of the Pocketnow Power User, we're going to talk about the glass that covers your smartphone, tablet, or wearable. Almost all of our smartphones, tablets, and wearables have a screen. Some are very small, like on your smartwatch or Google Glass, others are very large, like on your iPad or Surface. Still more are somewhere in ...

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    Roughly 18 months ago, smartwatches and other types of wearables were practically nonexistent. Sure, the Nike FuelBand started hitting shelves over two years ago, and a few fitness bands followed thereafter. But it was nothing to the degree it is today. FitBits are everywhere; I see random passersby wearing Pebbles; people ask me all the time if my "watch that buzzes" is "one of those Samsung things"; and it seems everyone is aware of the early onset #glassholes of this world. Wearables – especially smartwatches – are more in the public eye than ever, and some of the biggest companies ...

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    Following the WWDC keynote on Monday, some of us weren't exactly sure how to feel about the new iOS 8 update. Unlike last year, which was a huge visual overhaul, iOS 8 is more background and feature upgrades which make the update seem more incremental than it actually is. Behind the scenes, there's a lot of new stuff going on – a lot of stuff we never thought we'd see Apple ever announce. For one, it introduced third-party keyboards in iOS 8, placing a larger part of the user experience in the hands of third-party developers. Third-party sharing, something I've been harping on for years ...

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    Last year, Motorola took everyone by surprise. After months upon months of rumors, Motorola's 2013 flagship wasn't at all what it was cracked up to be. Rumors suggested it would be the phone everyone had been waiting for – all the best specs, the best display, killer everything. Turns out, the Moto X was not any of that. Its display was only 720p when practically every other flagship came with a 1080p display. It came with a custom processor configuration – not a Snapdragon 600 or 800 – which Motorola called the X8 mobile computing system. Nothing about it was overpowered or ...

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    Microsoft pushed out this nifty little app recently which does what I’ve been wanting to do for years. It’s called ‘Files’ appropriately, because it manages files on your phone. Android’s been doing this for eons via third party apps and Apple will probably never do it. But I had hoped that Microsoft might someday allow users to dig into the file system a bit and get some stuff done. Finally, we can do it. Actually, in all fairness, it looks like there's been at least one third party solution out there for at least a year. But, this official Microsoft  app single-handedly makes ...

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    Root and SuperUser access ("su") are two terms that are often used interchangeably. Essentially, if you have Root access, you can modify and replace system files. With this access level a user can run an app that will automatically sync the clock on their smartphone or tablet with the Atomic Clock, tweak the color settings of their display, or make a complete backup of their device. Users can replace radio firmware, or even swap out an entire ROM with something that's been customized by the community. It's just as easy for a malicious user to utilize Root as a vector for attack - running ...

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    If you have read my last few editorials, you’ll notice I get a lot of inspiration from the Pocketnow Weekly Podcast. That is because it’s awesome and apparently inspiring. So good for it. Last week on the Weekly, a comment was made by one of the hosts (I honestly don’t remember who) about how Samsung design is stagnant, which amounts to basically the same phone over and over again. There’s a reason it is called “Samesung” by detractors. That sent my little brain flying down a number of paths, paths that I will lay out here for you. Welcome to my mind. Please wipe your feet. ...

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    Each year around the same time, we look to Apple to bring some new features to its mobile platform. Each year, our anticipation for more useful, innovative features on iOS grows immensely. Maybe we're just demanding and ungrateful. Or maybe it's because, even for some strong Apple proponents, the software is beginning to feel a little stale. Last year's face-lift brought very few helpful changes to the platform; among the most notable were Control Center, folders with no app limitation on the Home screen, and AirDrop. But the brunt of the changes were dramatic visual changes – mostly in ...

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    Yesterday, Apple kick-started its annual developer conference, WWDC 2014, with a bang. To no surprise at all, it announced a newer version of OS X, Yosemite, alongside the anticipated update to its mobile platform, iOS 8. And like I so wittingly predicted, Apple has continued its slow marriage of the two contrasting operating systems. Many of the new features for both platforms allow users to start a task on one device and finish on the other, what Apple calls Continuity. For instance, you can start typing a message in iMessage on the iPad and finish typing it on the Mac. Or with iMessage ...

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