Posts tagged with: Editorial
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    Project Tango is an undertaking by Google's Advanced Technology and Projects group (ATAP), formerly a division of Motorola, with the "goal of giving mobile devices a human-scale understanding of space and motion". On the surface that sounds academic and boring, but start to peel away the layers and start looking at potential applications. and some amazing things come to mind. Currently Project Tango is just that, an internal project being worked on by a group inside Google. It doesn't stop there. According to Google's Johnny Lee, the ATAP-Project Tango Team has been working with ...

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    HTC appears to finally be getting the love it deserves in the mobile space. Its two most high-end handsets from the last two years received nothing but praise from the press and consumers. The One M7 won handfuls of awards and the One M8 is slated to do just the same. And, finally, after a long stint of hemorrhaging money, the company has turned a profit. Just last month, we had cause for concern. HTC's financials weren't looking so great. Revenue was down and the company was still losing money. However, we learned earlier today that HTC has finally started to turn things around. In its Q2 ...

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    We here at Pocketnow, especially yours truly, have voiced our opinions on so-called "mini" smartphones several times now. For the last few years now, Android manufacturers have been creating and releasing smaller versions of their annual flagships. Last year, HTC introduced the HTC One mini following its game-changing One M7. This year, the Taiwanese manufacturer followed-up its One M8 with the One mini 2. LG released the G2 mini last year and is expected to announce the G3 mini later this year. And, of course, Samsung has produced miniature Galaxy S smartphones for the last few years – ...

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    Android L is still a Developer Preview, nothing is set in stone, and who knows what might change before we see a final release later this Fall. In the meantime we're seeing some interesting tidbits surface regarding how the new OS will function, and some pretty significant changes that might be coming. Currently, when you go to the Play Store to download an app, you're presented with a laundry list of permissions an app may ask for. Based on most people we've talked to, the consensus is that users will typically accept everything just to continue past the screen and get on with the ...

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    So it’s an interesting question. Whenever any kind of new “thing” comes along, consumer demand is a hard aspect to pinpoint. Will they love it? Hate it? Not know what to do with it? These are all valid questions that any competent product and marketing team need to answer if a product is to succeed. This particular question came to my mind from a variety of sources. There was some discussion at my day job, and some discussion last week on the Pocketnow Weekly. At my day job, one co-worker commented that Android Wear didn’t really add anything except a slightly more convenient way ...

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    For years, Android enthusiasts begged Nokia to appease the masses with what they thought would be the perfect combination of the best software and hardware – its hardware running Google's mobile operating system, Android. Not everyone – including our own Michael Fisher – bought into the theoretical Nokia-made dream phone. But there is no denying it was an extremely popular concept. Back in 2010, even I was guilty of suggesting a Nokia-made Android smartphone would solve all my personal gripes with smartphones. And I continued to preach the same story until Microsoft announced it ...

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    Android L is still very much a developer preview, but there's one thing power users have been missing more than anything else: Root. With Chainfire away at Google I/O, development on this front slowed to a crawl. Lucky for all of us, Chainfire is back and has updated SuperSU to version 2.01. If you'd like more information about this version of SuperSU, head over to Chainfire's post. Some have claimed that this new version of SuperSU contains the ability to auto-root your Nexus 5 or 2013 Nexus 7. Unfortunately, this is not the case. However, rooting your Android L-powered device isn't ...

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    Both Android L and iOS 8 have been hot topics of late. Both developer previews have provided us with plenty to look forward to – third-party keyboards and sharing options in iOS, a new design language in Android L, built-in health and fitness features for both, and major improvements all around. Yesterday, we compared the Android L and iOS 8 developer previews, and while we understand these still are not completely finished versions of software, there are some things we'd like to change about each OS. There are things Google could learn from Apple and vice versa. Below, you will find ...

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    For the past week, we've been talking about all the new and shiny things in the upcoming Android L update. Yesterday, I installed the developer preview on the company Nexus 5, played with it off and on for a few hours, cross-checked all the new features with the old, wrote a script, and made a comparison video showing off how, at the end of the day, Android L and iOS 8 are actually very much alike. Frankly, I really like the new look of Material Design, the new Recent Apps menu is slick, all animations are buttery smooth, and there's not much to dislike about the new UI. The shade ...

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    The notification tray in Android holds a wealth of information that's available at a glance. We're not talking about the notification "shade", which can show quick toggles, interactive notifications, and so much more. No, what we're talking about is the bar that runs across the top of your screen. Right now my notification tray is telling me that my Bluetooth radio is turned on (but nothing's connected to it), that my WiFi is connected (with full-bars), that I'm in "airplane mode" (to keep my LTE radio turned off), that my battery is full, and what time it is. That's on my 2013 LTE Nexus 7 ...

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    So this week was exciting huh? Google I/O and the return of 3D graphics and animations in Android. Android Car, Android TV, Android Lunchboxes. All very exciting. So exciting, that it almost drowned out one of the more notable announcements of the Keynote: Android One. But it’s a confusing issue, so lets talk about it a little shall we? Android One is basically a blueprint for a low-end phone. It’s a set of hardware and software rules that OEMs can follow to make what amounts to a pretty good dual- SIM toting handset that is set to reel in “the next billion”. “The next billion” ...

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    Google recently released a Developer Preview of its latest version of Android: Android L. Though it's not final code by any stretch of the imagination, we wanted to see how it compares to Android 4.4.4 KitKat - the latest official release of the operating system. We headed over to Google's "L Developer Preview" page, downloaded, and installed Android L build LPV79 to our Nexus 5 (there is also a build for the 2013 Nexus 7, though only for the WiFi version). From there we spent half a day using it as our daily driver, hunting through the various screens to try and find differences and ...

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    Google introduced us to the next version of Android at Google I/O 2014 yesterday: Android L. Unfortunately, we won't have an official release of until "later this Fall", but we were promised a Developer Preview. This morning that preview landed, and we decided to go hands-on. We loaded it up on our Nexus 5, booted up, and took it for a spin. Click play to see what we found, and what you can expect from Android L. Make sure you watch all the way to the end to get a good look at the new boot animation.   If you'd like to give Android L a go on your own device you'll need to be running ...

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    On stage in San Francisco at the opening Google I/O 2014 keynote, Google unveiled and showed off a host of new features and services: Android Wear, Android Auto, Android TV, and Android L, the newest, yet-to-be-named version of its mobile platform. During the keynote, the search giant made a few things very clear. One, it wants a consistent experience across all its products and services, so it announced a new design language, which it calls Material Design. Two, Android is quickly becoming the staple and primary vehicle for all things Google. Wait, hasn't Android been that for Google for ...

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    Today’s Google I/O Keynote left me a bit on the disappointed side. Sure, Android L looks pretty cool. Somehow the 3D interface is back after a two-year hiatus since everything needs to have depth, apparently. I must have missed that memo, but anyway. There were no new tablets and no new phones but there was an Android Wear smartwatch or three, which brings me to the point of this article. One of the bright spots of the keynote was the official presentation of Android Wear and a real solid walkthrough of the interface and its capabilities. There weren’t a whole lot of surprises there. ...

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