Posts tagged with: dmca
  • by |

    Right now in the US, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act prevents unauthorized unlocking of smartphone hardware for operation on another carrier. In the past, unlocking had been awarded a specific DMCA exemption, but after that rule failed to be renewed, the practice returned to illegality. Ever since, there's been talk from multiple branches of government suggesting that a change of law needs to happen, firmly establishing the legitimacy of unlocking. We've discussed some of these efforts in the past, but now it looks like real headway is finally being made, as the Senate passes the ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    The DMCA sure has been a thorn in the side of smartphone enthusiasts in the US lately, first getting a lot of attention for its role in restricting the ability for smartphone owners to carrier unlock their handsets, and now today we see it used to disrupt a number of custom ROM projects. A company called DxO Labs recently sent out a DMCA takedown notice to GitHub, requesting that files related to a number of code repositories be removed for violations under the Act. Those includes some work that's part of CyanogenMod. Things get a little confusing when we look at just why this request was ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    There's been a major shift in the public perception of the DMCA's treatment of smartphone carrier unlocking this month, and following a statement by the White House that it supported changing the existing law, we started hearing about legislation aimed at doing just that. It quickly became a hot-button topic with Congress, and we told you about one such proposal, the Wireless Device Independence Act. Now there's a new one gaining traction, the Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act, but is it really the victory we need? The nice thing about the Wireless Device Independence ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Watch today's Pocketnow Daily as we talk about the possible new AMOLED technology coming to the Galaxy S 4. Later we go through some more Samsung though this time we talk about how Samsung and Apple might adopt wireless charging for their next devices. Apple is next as they seem interested in music streaming, but under their rules. Then we talk about the HTC One, though sadly the news aren't good. We end today's show talking about how AT&T misses the point about carrier unlocks. All this and more after the break. Stories: - Galaxy S IV Could Employ New AMOLED Material - Samsung and ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    AT&T released a statement this morning on its Public Policy Blog, in response to the recent grass-roots efforts seeking legislative action to remove the DMCA prohibition on carrier-unlocking smartphones. AT&T contends that such action isn't necessary, as the current situation permits carriers to unlock phones at their customers' request, which AT&T says it's more than happy to do. The problem is, that totally ignores a significant, legitimate class of users looking to unlock phones. AT&T says that it will happily unlock phones for "any customer whose account has been active ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    March is sure shaping up to be a great month for proponents of smartphone users' rights in the US. First we saw the chair of the FCC talk about supporting work towards once again legalizing end-user smartphone unlocking, and earlier this week we heard the White House throw its weight behind efforts to accomplish the same goal. In its statement, the White House mentioned seeking legislation to free unlocking from the oversight of the DMCA, and now we're learning about the first such bill to propose those changes, introduced before Congress as the Wireless Device Independence Act. Democratic ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Smartphone owners in the United States have made their voices heard: when it comes to network-unlocking handsets, they don't want the carriers getting the final word. While until recently, an exemption to the DMCA let users unlock their own phones without fear of legal repercussions, a recent reevaluation of those exemptions removed the protection for unlocking. In an effort to bring unlocking back, concerned users signed a petition requesting the White House to do something about the situation. After crossing the 100,000 signature threshold, the petition was guaranteed a response, and ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    You might think that rules regarding carriers locking smartphones to their networks would be the kind of thing overseen by the FCC, but the way things currently work in the US, that provision is addressed by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, with exemptions granted by the Library of Congress. After the last round of consideration removed protection for users interested in unlocking their phones, public outcry resulted in a successful petition to force the White House to discuss the issue. It turns out that FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski is interested, as well, citing concerns he has ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Last time the United States reconsidered which exemptions it would grant to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the right to carrier unlock your smartphone, previously protected under an earlier round of exemptions, was taken off the table. While jailbreaking is still kosher, you're now only able to legally unlock your phone by asking your carrier nicely. In an effort to see this situation change, a petition was started to force the White House to, at the least, acknowledge and comment upon the situation, with the goal of pushing it towards action to restore unlocking protections. Last ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Last month, the expiration of DMCA exemptions for protection of users choosing to unlock their smartphones vanished, after it failed to be re-approved during the most recent round of exemption considerations. We talked about just what this meant at the time, and the potential impact it could have on the mobile market. While it's another three years before the exemption is set to be reevaluated, a petition has been underway on the White House's We the People site asking the administration to take action before then. The petition seeks to have the White House either overrule the Librarian of ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    Unfortunately, the DMCA reaches into our pockets and handbags -- even if you're not in the United States much of the rules impact your life. You see, the DMCA is essentially a roll-up of two international treaties having to do with copyright protections and fair use, and codified into U.S. Law. Other countries have similar laws all based on the same core treaties. Today is the day when the Librarian of Congress' new Digital Millennium Copyright Act rules go into effect. Depending on which news source you read, the sky is either falling, or everything is smooth sailing.  We talked a ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    You know the drill: another week, another overload of tech news for three geeky guys to talk about. On this exiciting episode of the Pocketnow Weekly, though, things are a little different: in addition to the usual news from the three big mobile platforms, Michael, Anton, and Joe discuss issues of major import for the industry in our broadcast's new preshow segment. Today's "Thought Thread" covers the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and its impact on smartphones and tablets, as well as a little invention called CommBadge that has the potential to bring voice interface back into the ...

    Share
    Read On
  • by |

    The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is essentially the implementation of two treaties from the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) into United States Law. In a nutshell, it criminalizes "production and dissemination of technology, devices, or services intended to circumvent measures ... that control access to copyrighted works". So far it sounds pretty innocent, right? The DMCA also criminalizes not only circumventing "access control" but any "attempt" to circumvent those controls -- even if there isn't any actual infringement of copyright. To make matters worse, the ...

    Share
    Read On
Switch to mobile version
Mobile Version