Posts tagged with: cyanogenmod
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    Those of you who are familiar with me know that I love CyanogenMod. Even with a house full of Nexus devices which came with the "stock" version of Android (the way Google intended it), the majority of my devices run CyanogenMod. CyanogenMod is a custom ROM started by Steve Kondik, "Cyanogen" himself, back in 2009. It originated as an extension of the JF ROM that I ran on my first Android, the T-Mobile G1. Steve was a self-described "noob" at the time, and afraid that he'd be "laughed off the (XDA) forums". Fortunately for him (and for the community), his work was embraced. Before long he ...

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    Watch today's Pocketnow Daily as we talk about NVIDIA's new Tegra Note platform, and what we can expect from it. Then we talk about YouTube's plans to enhance their mobile application to allow offline video on mobile devices. CyanogenMod is next as the service has now officially become a company dubbed CyanogenMod Inc. and plans to enhance their user experience with Android. BlackBerry is next as we talk about their new BlackBerry Z30, specific dates for BBM to reach Android and iOS, and then the sad news that 40% of their work force will get laid off. We end today's show talking about the ...

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    For users just get started with the custom ROM community, CyanogenMod has long been the gold standard. With tons of features, good compatibility, and a vibrant development community, it sure helped lower the bar for smartphone owners interested in expanding beyond the manufacturer-approved software their phones were stuck with. Today, the whole CyanogenMod project takes on a new direction, with announcement of the formation of Cyanogen Inc. This has been in the works since late last year, when former Boost Mobile co-founder Kirt McMaster approached Steve Kondik with his vision for the ...

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    A little earlier this month, we shared a rumor with you that Google might be thinking of giving users more control over how apps interact with Android, granting you the ability to pick and choose which permissions you wanted an app to have, rather than granting them in an all-or-nothing situation. Some of you mentioned in the comments about how CyanogenMod used to do this, but removed the feature. As luck would have it, project leader Steve Kondik took to Google+ this afternoon to not only discuss that issue, but the larger scope of security and privacy issues affecting Android. Kondik ...

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    Google's Android OS has morphed and adapted in the years since it was originally released. Some of those changes have been "under the hood", while others have been more cosmetic in nature. We suspect the next version of Android, Key Lime Pie, will include some pretty significant UI changes. Could some of those changes be "pie-esque"? We've recently talked about the possibility of a gesture-based UI in the upcoming version of the operating system. We've even shown off a pie-like launcher that you can install on your Android today. Various custom ROMs have pie-based launchers and controls ...

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    Android users aren't forced into a life of running just one ROM forever like owners of some "other" devices are. Users can change the way their device looks by changing wallpaper, widgets, and even the launcher (the app that is used to start every app). But Android takes that one step further: after rooting, users can flash almost any ROM they want on their device. The reasons for flashing a custom ROM are as varied at the people doing the flashing. Perhaps they want to change the look and feel of their device. Maybe they want to get rid of bloatware. They might want to get rid of their ...

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    Ever recorded a 90-minute podcast full of Skype-related artifacts and drop-outs, only to find once you wrap it up that you used the wrong mic? If so, you know the pain we've experienced cutting together today's episode of the Pocketnow Weekly podcast. Sorry for the levels on this one, folks; it's unfortunate, and we've done all we can to normalize them, but you're probably going to be twisting your volume knob an awful lot over the course of this here episode. On the bright side, if you manage to endure, you'll be treated to some excellent discussion on everything from Galaxy S IV leaks to ...

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    Shortly after we started seeing Ubuntu for Phones showing up on some of our favorite Android-powered smartphones and tablets, we started hearing rumors and rumblings about its origins. Specifically, people started saying that Ubutuntu for Phones is "based on" CyanogenMod custom ROM. At first blush one might think that based on comments like these: "Indications for Ubuntu porting to other devices is quite simple since it has the same basis as CyanogenMod 10.1 with Ubuntu Interface Touch running in a container and accessed via chroot." That sounds a lot like Ubuntu for Phones is not only ...

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    CyanogenMod is one of my favorite Android-based custom ROMs, as previous articles will attest. Earlier this week the CyanogenMod team hit a major milestone with their 10.1 builds, based on Android Jelly Bean 4.2.1: CyanogenMod 10.1 M1. In the past the CM team released builds somewhat haphazardly, with experimental builds showing up whenever they felt like it. More recently they've turned to a "nightly" build cycle where code from the previous day is compiled and distributed in "Nightly" builds. These builds are described as being experimental and "probably broken", and should only be used ...

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    If you've been following Pocketnow for any length of time, you know that one of our favorite custom ROMs for Android-powered phones and tablets is CyanogenMod ROM. It's fast, it's lightweight, and for the most part it's pure Android. CyanogenMod has some advantages over other ROMs, specifically the way its built allows one set of developers to maintain and improve the core ROM, and another set to maintain the many, many devices they support. The reasons to flash a custom ROM are many and varied. Top reasons include performance improvements, increased features, and being able to run the ...

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    Just in case you've been living under a rock, Jelly Bean is the latest version of Google's Android OS and picks up where Ice Cream Sandwich left off. Some of us thought Jelly Bean might be Android 5.0, but we were wrong, it's 4.1 -- a small step up from ICS, which is 4.0. CyanogenMod (or CM, for short) is one of the most popular custom ROMs on the market and supports a huge number of different phones and tablets. Just before this year's Google I/O the CyanogenMod team put out the Release Candidate of CM9 for 37 devices. Since we were expecting JB at Google I/O, why did the CM team release ...

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    Even though the internals of the Samsung Galaxy S III offer a great user experience in terms of speed -- and the new TouchWiz UX Nature that Samsung bundled is really lightweight and fast -- some might still prefer a vanilla Android experience on today's best Android smartphone made by the South Korean manufacturer. CyanogenMod 9 Nightlies are now available for the phone. The Nightly build are the latest ones but often contain some bugs; in this case, "FM Radio is currently not supported, using LED flash causes some problems and waking the device up using volume keys might not work ...

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    In our last video we showed off CyanogenMod 9. Among the topics we covered were "Profiles" and a teaser of something awesome to come in our next video -- this video. Switching profile's isn't all that quick. It's somewhat unfortunate because the several screen taps that are required to switch between profiles has been enough to keep me from using them. With NFC, that all changes. Hit play, and prepare to have your mind blown. Interested in getting some NFC tags, you need only head over to Amazon.com to see a huge list of tags that you can buy. They will probably cost you around $1.50 ...

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    CyanogenMod is my favorite custom ROM, I've been using it since I had my original Android: a T-Mobile G1. It's gone through a lot of iterations since then. The most recent of which is almost done: CM9, based on AOSP Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich. How far has the CM team come with version 9? Let's take a look! New Mascot I'd like to introduce you to Cid, CyanogenMod's new mascott. He's Cyanogen Blue (cyan, I suppose), and now no longer a chunky little android. Nope, now he's a teenager -- with an attitude. The boot animation has been changed to reflect the new mascot, but the nightlies ...

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    The easiest way to customize your Android-powered phone or tablet is to install a 3rd-party launcher to replace that which comes pre-installed on the device. In previous episodes of "Launcher Wars" we've shown off various launchers, each with their own advantages. Today we'll dig into Trebuchet by Cyanogen, the launcher that comes pre-loaded in the CyanogenMod9 custom ROM.

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