Posts tagged with: Chrome
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    As we're sure many of you are aware, the major design language shift in Android Lollipop has inevitably spurred a mass outbreak of updates. We sure aren't complaining, and the next app to join in on the fun is Chrome, which now finally has its Chrome 39 for Android update out of beta and pushed to the stable channel. Here's what's new. You'll of course only be able to take advantage of the main tweaks if you are running Android 5.0, but you're not entirely out in the cold if not. There's now a colored status bar that can be defined by web developers (we've got it working it with Pocketnow; ...

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    For many of us, web browsing is the heart and soul of our mobile usage. Browsing web pages from a coffee shop on your phone or buying something from Amazon while waiting in line are what make modern smartphones so different from their ancestors. Mobile browsing today is not all that bad, fairly enjoyable, and actually pretty efficient. So how do the two most popular mobile platforms compare when it comes to mobile browsing? Ignoring all the third-party options available on both and not considering meaningless benchmarks or page load times, the out-of-the-box browsing experience on Android ...

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    Today may be June 18, which means we got Amazon's announcement of its Fire phone a little earlier today, and T-Mobile's Uncarrier 5.0 event is coming up a few hours later on, but more than just being the eighteenth, it's also a Wednesday. You smartphone users with blood that runs Android green know what that means, as it's time for Google to make with its latest batch of Android app updates. We haven't spotted a ton of them this week, but at least a few new releases are on their way out to users, with updated versions of Drive and Hangouts arriving, along with some other new editions. ...

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    Mobile devices used to be primarily portable email boxes with integrated calendar and contacts. In the early days, some of them may have included web browsers, but they were very primitive. Back then the Web was very complex, and designed for screens with resolutions of 800 by 600 and higher. To accommodate phones and PDAs a "new" web was invented, one that used a completely different protocol to address the concerns of much smaller screens, slower processors, and mobile data plans. None of which were anywhere close to what we have today. WAP & WML This "new" web was based on something ...

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    When you think of Google these days, you think of a lot of things: search, Android, Chrome, and even a digital content store, aptly named Google Play. The last thing you would likely ever tie Google directly to is a physical retail location, a brick and mortar store. No less, a report surfaced late last week suggesting Google was about to do just that … again. Currently, Google has Android stores in Australia, which go by the name Androidland. This time, Google is looking for a physical retail location for all things Google in New York City, according to Crain's NY. It's looking at an ...

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    For a while now, evidence has been pointing towards Google's work to bring Chrome apps to our smartphones. And no, we're not talking about generic web apps on your Chrome mobile browser, but the sort of Chrome apps previously only available to desktop users. Last fall, Google started setting the framework for giving these apps a whole lot more flexibility, including offline operation and getting increased access to system resources. Rumors had suggested at least a beta version of smartphone support could come as soon as this month, today that's confirmed, as Google announces a developer ...

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    If you all remember last week's news about Google's Chrome browser receiving an update with very interesting features for Android users. Among these we saw Google launching new data compression tools that would use Google servers to optimize website navigation speeds and data consumption on mobile devices, in a similar way to what we've seen from Opera for years. As expected, this new feature has just been announced for iOS today, and you should be seeing the update now, or you may access it on the iTunes Store as well. Aside from these data compression features, Google is also including ...

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    Watch today's Pocketnow Daily as we talk about Apple and how it's forced to reimburse $32.5 Million to parents affected by in-app purchases. Google Chrome is next as the browser will now compress data in servers to give you a more efficient and faster browsing. HP is next as the company has silently announced the VoiceTab 6 and VoiceTab 7 phablets and tablets respectively. Motorola follows the news as we talk about its plans to build a tablet under the Moto Maker service that we currently know for the Moto X. We end today's show talking about the Blackphone, and what this means to your ...

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    Wireless carriers have made some decent strides in improving the sorts of plans they offer, but even with the new options that are available, cellular service can still be a very expensive proposition. That's driven some of us to elect to go with smaller data caps, keeping our bills down, but limiting just how useful our phones can really be. Some developers have endeavored to squeeze as much value as possible out of low data allowances by compressing data to reduce how much is transferred – this was always the big selling point of browsers like Opera Mini. Today we learn that Google's ...

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    Smartphone users have been taking advantage of touchscreen input for so long now, that it's easy to forget just how impressive it all is. Remember just a few years back when resistive screens were the norm, and multi-touch gestures were little more than a dream? For as feature-rich as our touchscreen experience has become, it's not without cost; sometimes developers have to make performance trade-offs in order to keep all those features working right. That's just what we're looking at today, as we learn of an improvement coming to Chrome that could make navigating through sites just a ...

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    Last week Pocketnow's Stephen Schenck talked about Chrome apps, and Google's plans to bring them to iOS and Android. As Stephen says, "a lot of users probably think this is great news. Me, I don't care for it." He's not alone. The points he brings up are entirely valid -- and completely miss the point. Let's talk about apps Before we get into all that, let's take a moment to talk about apps, shall we? "Apps" used to be called "programs" or "applications". They still are, of course, but apparently those words are too lengthy for us to say any more. "Apps" just sounds sexy, I suppose. For ...

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    When we talk about Google and apps here at Pocketnow, we're almost without fail discussing the Play Store: your one-stop shop for apps, games, media – pretty much everything you could hope to find for your Android smartphone or tablet. But because our charter is so focused on mobile tech, we tend to overlook another big arm of Google's app interests: the Chrome Web Store. Here, users of the popular browser will find hundreds and hundreds of apps, primarily built using Java, HTML, and CSS, but also with the option for a sandboxed “native client” mode when performance is a key ...

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    Web apps get a lot of flack: they're slow, they're amateurish, they're poor excuses for full-blown native apps. But sometimes they're either the best option for the job, or all that's even available. If you're stuck using web apps, why not make the experience as nice as possible? To that end, Google's introducing a number of features in its latest Chrome for Android beta release, focused on really fleshing-out how web apps work. The new mode is called Install to Homescreen, but it goes beyond just that. Apps installed in such a manner will launch full-screen, without the usual browser UI ...

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    Watch today's Pocketnow Daily as we talk about Google's new offer to iOS developers to use Chrome as their navigation tool. LG is next as we talk about their probable tablet plans for the fall, along with their scheduled event for May 30th. Then let's talk about the HTC First which now gets a big price cut on AT&T, for reasons we can only assume. Samsung is next as we talk about the new galaxy devices that they'll release in the next coming months, and no, by new galaxy we don't mean the Galaxy S 4. We end today's show talking about Nokia, their EOS project, and how this can all become ...

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    It is no fun trying to horn-in on Apple's turf when it comes to iOS, and no matter how much of a better browser you think you can make, the platform is going to keep steering users back to Safari. What's a dev to do? If you're Google, trying to raise Chrome's image on iOS, you reach out to other developers, giving them some interesting ways to let their users interact with web pages. What this new system lets developers do is have their apps send users over to Chrome to check out a web page. The system call directs them to Chrome in specific, bypassing Safari in the process. Devs might ...

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