Posts tagged with: carriers
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    We tend to get a little fussy over carrier bloat, or the pre-installed applications that may come on a number of carrier-specific Android or Windows Phone smartphones. Bloat can and often does come from carriers, partners like Amazon, and even the manufacturer. For instance, I bought the T-Mobile HTC One M8 just this morning. It comes with five T-Mobile-specific applications I'll rarely (if ever) use: Mobile HotSpot, My Account, T-Mobile Name ID, T-Mobile TV, and Visual Voicemail. While it's mostly minimal, these applications cannot be uninstalled – only reverted to the original versions ...

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    T-Mobile is the most interesting carrier in the United States. Since John Legere came aboard as CEO in September 2012, the company has transformed from a staid, conflicted brand trying too hard to be "hip" to something legitimately compelling. T-Mobile's "Uncarrier" push has seen the company nab the iPhone, wipe out international roaming charges, offer earlier device upgrades, eliminate early termination fees, and even pay the termination fees of those switching to its network. Combined with Legere's unconventional antics and a bold new approach to marketing its services, these changes ...

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    I want to make this clear right up front: as a consumer, I really like AT&T. The nation's second-largest carrier has, for my entire time as a customer, provided me with outstanding LTE speeds, excellent coverage in the places I live and work, and a device selection that blows my previous carrier out of the water. Its rate plans aren't cheap, but they're at least fair - and I'm even reasonably certain the provider has my back in case of a national emergency. I like AT&T a lot. But seeing the Lumia 1020 announced this morning as yet another Ma Bell exclusive put a sour taste in my ...

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    Here's a thing I don't get. Restrictions. Restrictions are, as a rule, kinda bad. There is little in this world more frustrating than the absolute declaration of “This shall not be done”. It's rather like those memos you get at work. You know the ones. The ones that say “From now on you can only use these two phrases to end a phone call – blah and blah” (Bear with me. I work in a call center). But when the phone call ends, that awkward moment comes when your customer says some type of good bye, and you're forced to utter, “Thank you for calling [wherever], and don't forget ...

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    We all love smartphones. Without them, Pocketnow wouldn't exist, and my decades-old dream of living in Star Trek's universe of awesome pocketable gadgets would never have been realized. It's fair to say that everyone here -editors and readers alike- understands and appreciates smartphones and other connected devices. But sometimes we take our eye off the significance of the infrastructure supporting those devices. Sure, we take a peek at carrier equipment here and there, but too often the billions of dollars' worth of network hardware that enables our portable gadgets goes completely ...

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    There is no shortage of options when it comes to communicating with a modern smartphone. There are literally hundreds – likely even thousands – of different ways to communicate. There's the voice call, which is no longer a staple in mobile communication for many. And there is an endless supply of different IP messengers available, free of charge, depending on what mobile OS you use. There's email, for the more traditional feel of correspondence. And there are several popular social networking sites around the Web that are (generally) easy to access via mobile and, likewise, great for ...

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    I bought my first mobile phone in 2001. It was a Samsung SCH-3500, and it featured a carrier logo printed square in the center of the flip, its red-and-black insignia proclaiming to all and sundry that the device was beholden to one company for its connectivity: Sprint. No matter that the SCH-3500 was exclusive to Sprint in the U.S. and couldn't possibly have operated on any other carrier; the logo was there, and as I was unwilling to embark on some acetone-fueled adventures to remove it, there it remained for the duration of my time with the device. And almost every mobile phone I've ...

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    We love us some new technology, and we certainly give it its fair shake on today's episode of the Pocketnow Weekly. But every so often, you need to give a little lip-service to the tech of days gone by. The platforms and devices of yesteryear. That's right: I'm talking about dead technology. It makes sense, then, that a man going by the twitter handle DeadTechnology is here to help us dust off those fond memories. In his inaugural visit to the Pocketnow Weekly, our own Adam Doud pulls back the veil of public apathy secrecy surrounding the phenomenon of the "webOS meetup," a regular ...

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    CES 2013 was many things: a beacon of hope offering tons of potential for the new year in tech; a smorgasbord of cool devices and odd offerings to drool over; and, to hardware-hungry mobile mavens like me, something of a disappointment overall. Still, there was enough newsworthy content for the Pocketnow team to generate over 30 videos packed with mobile-tech reporting. And in the process of shoving all those frames into the YouTubes, we became well-acquainted with the constraints of mobile data networks. Amid the throng of over a hundred thousand people trying to do the exact same thing ...

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    When you're coming down off a few weeks of huge news, there's a lot to sift through. On this episode of the Pocketnow Weekly, that's exactly what we're doing. Join Michael Fisher, Brandon Miniman, and -a first for the podcast- Chief News Editor Stephen Schenck for in-depth discussion on Apple's continuing iPhone 5 and iOS6 successes and failures, the latest in the annoyingly-named "mapplegate," HTC's new One X+ and One VX, speculation on the next Nexus, Nokia's terrifying new commercial aimed at the iPhone, and even a touch of webOS news. We changed up the order a bit this week, everyone, ...

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    One of the awesome things about mobile technology today is that most of us have been around long enough to witness several generations of its evolution. We've seen mobile phones progress from outsized boxes with 4-line monochrome LCDs, to tiny clamshells with blue backlights and internal antennas, back into outsized boxes- now with HD displays and internals that beat out some notebook computers. But the evolution we've followed for years isn't confined to handheld hardware. The networks that fuel the little packages of future-tech we carry in our pockets have undergone their own sweeping ...

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    "Reception is just awful out here," says the woman at the coffee shop counter, the iPhone in her hand rebuffing her repeated attempts to launch the Starbucks app to secure a discount on her iced-Venti-whatever. "I've had one signal bar for the last hour." "It's the weather," the barista promptly (and incorrectly) replies, gesturing to the reluctant smartphone. "There's a storm coming." The customer blinks and looks down at her phone. "Really?" she asks. "Huh." No, not really, I think to myself, but I'm too busy trying to connect my laptop to the coffee shop's WiFi network to offer any ...

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    It's an alluring concept: pay $19 per month (plus tax), get unlimited voice calling, text messaging, and data access. On a smartphone. Sure, it might run an older version of Android on dated, costly hardware, but it's still a smartphone. With an unlimited plan. Without a contract. For 19 smackers a month. That's the dream North Carolina-based carrier Republic Wireless is trying to deliver on with its new pricing scheme, a rate plan buried in taglines heavy on the word "freedom." Competing wireless carriers in the United States typically charge three to five times as much for their ...

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    I give out my phone number freely, all over the world. I put it on my Facebook profile. I give it to people I'm only going to talk to once in my life. I throw it in my email signature, on scripts or notebooks I'm using, and on business cards I pass out to all and sundry. And this is my personal phone number I'm talking about, not some office line or a demo phone I tote around for fun. It's a direct link to me. Lets get this out of the way now: no, I'm not putting my digits here in this post, or in the comments. I may be reckless, but I'm not stupid. For most people, treating something as ...

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    “I really want that new Galaxy [S III],” a friend recently told me, “but I can’t afford it.” Around the same time, another acquaintance serendipitously tweeted the following: “Someone should really do something to educate American consumers about device cost vs. plan cost.” Not one to ignore the power of serendipity, I decided I’d take a whack at it. The recent bump in the average cost of high-end smartphones has been tough to ignore. Led by Motorola’s DROID RAZR line and Samsung’s Galaxy S device family, price tags next to top-shelf devices have inflated by $50-$100 ...

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