Posts tagged with: bloatware
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    Some things in life should be exclusive, like the people who are allowed to drive my car or eventually date my daughter. Other things, however, should be open to the general public. Parks, roads, drinking fountains, and the front seats of busses come to mind. Unfortunately, that's not the way things work over here in the States, at least not when we're talking about cellular phones. Carrier exclusives are still very much a thing -- although they should not be, not any more anyway. "Exclusives" are just like they sound, "restricted or limited to the person, group, or area concerned". When ...

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    We tend to get a little fussy over carrier bloat, or the pre-installed applications that may come on a number of carrier-specific Android or Windows Phone smartphones. Bloat can and often does come from carriers, partners like Amazon, and even the manufacturer. For instance, I bought the T-Mobile HTC One M8 just this morning. It comes with five T-Mobile-specific applications I'll rarely (if ever) use: Mobile HotSpot, My Account, T-Mobile Name ID, T-Mobile TV, and Visual Voicemail. While it's mostly minimal, these applications cannot be uninstalled – only reverted to the original versions ...

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    For some reason carriers like to load up "their" phones with apps that they think you want. These apps take up space on an already limited storage partition, they occupy screen real-estate in your app drawer, and in most cases you can't remove them. We affectionately refer to these apps as "bloatware" because just like after eating a big holiday meal, they leave our phones feeling lethargic and overweight. Because OEMs and carriers install bloatware as system apps, you've got to have root permissions to remove them. Most of the time that means unlocking, rooting, and installing a custom ...

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    Bloatware has been with us since the early days of desktop and laptop computers. OEMs "pre-packaged" applications that the thought would "add value" and make their products more desirable than their competition. Of course this meant their competition would respond by simply adding even more on their computers. Eventually, software vendors got the idea of providing "incentives" to OEMs for pre-bundling software. This lead to some computers coming so pre-loaded with bloatware that some OEMs began offering customization services to remove the pre-loaded apps -- for a fee. We've seen the same ...

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