Posts tagged with: android power user
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    When we talk about root or "rooting" your smartphone or tablet, we're talking about bypassing the built-in securities and permissions that come prepackaged on your device so you can obtain "privileged control" or "root access". Our Apple-toting friends often call this "jailbreaking", which, in a manner of speaking, it is. OEMs lock our devices down "for our own good", to keep us from breaking them or allowing malicious software to get inside and do damage. A secondary objective is to make sure that we can't do anything that the OEM, carrier, or OS vendor don't want us to do - which makes ...

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    Regardless of how large the batteries in our portable electronics are, or how efficiently their SoCs power them, we never seem to have "enough" power. Thankfully, Android lets you see what apps and processes are using your battery, so you can take corrective measures and (ideally) get the most out of the limited mAhs in your LiPo cell. Take a look at your own stats. Open Settings and tap on Battery. Depending on which version of Android you're running and how heavily your OEM has skinned your device, you'll probably see a chart with a list of apps and processes beneath it. The ...

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    As Android users, most of us have the ability to sideload apps directly onto our smartphones and tablets - no app store needed! People who use other operating systems on their mobile devices aren't always so lucky. To load apps on their devices from sources other than those officially sanctioned by the company that makes their phone, many have to go through a jailbreaking or unlocking process. While not necessarily a "bad" thing, jailbreaking brings with it many other implications that reach significantly deeper than simply installing an app. Most Android-powered devices provide the ...

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    There are many reasons why you'd want to root your phone, but  an LG G Watch root via a custom ROM? Yup. And it's awesome! Smartwatches powered by Google's Android Wear operating system are starting to show up on wrists across the world. Right now people are starting to get used to the idea of notifications showing up on their watch, and beginning to see the utility of talking back to it to get things done -- even though it still looks a little weird. With a relatively limited number of apps in the Play Store, Power Users everywhere are itching to see what the hardware can do. As such, ...

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    In our last episode we talked about the glass that covers our smartphone screens. Today we're diving into the types of displays under that glass, the pros and cons of both types, and which you'll want in your next smartphone or tablet. Touch Screens Screens recognize touch by one of two technologies: resistive or capacitive. Resistive touch screens all but require a stylus or similar device be used to register accurate touches. These are the types of screens that we had back in the Palm, Newton, and Windows Mobile days. They're not terribly expensive to manufacture, but they aren't that ...

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    Root and SuperUser access ("su") are two terms that are often used interchangeably. Essentially, if you have Root access, you can modify and replace system files. With this access level a user can run an app that will automatically sync the clock on their smartphone or tablet with the Atomic Clock, tweak the color settings of their display, or make a complete backup of their device. Users can replace radio firmware, or even swap out an entire ROM with something that's been customized by the community. It's just as easy for a malicious user to utilize Root as a vector for attack - running ...

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    We live in a day and age where electronic devices are an integral part of our daily routine. What's inside them that gives them the power to do so many amazing things? On today's episode of Pocketnow Power User we're going to talk about the brain that powers your device: the CPU. The Central Processing Unit, or CPU for short, has been around for quite some time, but has changed significantly over the years. Traditionally the CPU has been the "traffic-cop", the component that handles and routes all the commands flowing through the system to the place where they need to go. It's backed up by ...

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    We live in a day and age where our phones, tablets, and wearables are an integral part of our regular routine. Metal versus plastic, megapixels, screen size, battery capacity, CPU cores, RAM, storage capacity, and more all get thrown around by marketers when trying to convince us their product is somehow superior to that of their competitor. Sure, all those all important, but what do all the numbers really mean? How does each item on the spec sheet translate into value for your dollar? If you're interested in the nuts and bolts, the hardware that powers your devices, you're probably lost ...

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    Tethering is one of those things that many of us got really excited about way back in the early days of cell phones. Here we had a little phone that we could connect to our laptop which would let us access the Internet or closed network (the office, university, etc.) without having to plug into a land-line to do so. Speeds weren't all that great, but being able to work from anywhere often trumped that. Today we have our choice of various high-speed technologies offered by any one of a handful of cellular carriers. We also have numerous ways to connect our laptops to our phones -- and we ...

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    Over the last little while we've heard that various devices (typically tablets) may be released that have the ability to dual-boot into your choice of operating systems. Some may know what dual-booting is, and others may not. The majority are probably scratching their heads and asking, what is dual-booting, and what are the pros and cons. What is dual-booting? Let's start with something basics. What is "booting" when it comes to smartphones, tablets, and even computers? The basic explanation is "turning on" or "starting up".  In more detail, "booting" is loading a set of instructions ...

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    The original Nexus 7 was quite a piece of work when it was originally released back in 2012. Pocketnow's own Brandon Miniman even rated the device an 8.7 out of 10 in his review. Not bad for a tablet that cost less than US$200. What starts to happen almost immediately after we get our fancy new devices? They start to slow down. At least that's what it feels like, right?  Usually this perception is caused by installing a whole bunch of apps that take up more space in the system's RAM, apps getting bigger and slower, and updates to the operating system taking up more space. All of these are ...

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    Power users will likely recognize the name +Chainfire as one of the developers who brought superuser to Android and helped make rooting achievable for countless others. As you might expect, he's still very much into the "guts" of Android, and recently came across something a little troubling. When some power users pointed out a recent commit to the AOSP master tree, Chainfire found a significant amount of Android root changes -- which could break the majority of today's root apps. The change AOSP is the "core" Android code that developers use to create ROMs for their devices. Rooting is ...

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    When I first got my original Nexus 7, I loved it. Over time, however, it got slower and slower. As it turns out, I wasn't alone. These tablets that started out snappy got gradually slower over time, until they were almost painful to use. Then Android 4.3 came along, and much of that slowness went away. Why? Google sneaked in a feature that's slowly helping restore my sanity: Android TRIM support. Let's get some terminology and technology out of the way. When you think about how computers store files, you probably picture a hard drive (HDD), a rotating set of platters that stores data ...

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    Google's Nexus 4 is essentially an LG Optimus G, which has LTE support -- so why don't we? In short, Google disabled it. But we're Android Power Users, aren't we? Yes, we are! Here's how to get LTE on your Nexus 4. First up, some disclaimers. This information has been around for a little while and some of you may say that it's "old news". That's partially true. Although the radio in the Nexus 4 has support for LTE, it doesn't have the certification and some hardware optimizations that are needed to implement it fully. Originally, you could simply make a few changes and get LTE to work for ...

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    A while back, we at Pocketnow faced a challenge: our Android articles were taking more time to write and our videos were getting long. The reason for both  was due to the fact that we try and write our articles and script our videos so they apply and are readily understandable by the majority of our audience. We have a very diverse audience -- which is wonderful! Unfortunately, explaining all the nitty gritty details was sometimes overwhelming to various segments of our audience. They'd get lost in the details and miss out on the cool stuff. Another segment of our audience, Android Power ...

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